HomeCarcinomaCan Basal Cell Carcinoma Spread

Can Basal Cell Carcinoma Spread

General Principles In Outer Nose Repair

Can Basal Cell Carcinoma Spread?

Most of nasal skin is of the sebaceous type. Whenever possible, scar lines should be placed along relaxed skin tension lines. Aesthetic units of the nose need consideration although tumours do not respect their borders. Aging affects the nose anatomy. Characteristic symptoms are frown lines , transverse crease on the nasal root, drooping of tip of nose, and deepened nasolabial folds. Skin diseases of elderly, like rosacea and rhinophyma can interfere with surgical techniques.

The skin covering the bony parts is highly movable, while the skin over cartilage parts is thicker, tighter and bound to the cartilage. Healing by second ary intention of convex surfaces like the nose tip should be avoided since healing often is delayed and may lead to uneven scars.

How Successful Is Basal Cell Carcinoma Treatment

Mohs micrographic surgery has the best cure rates with basal cell carcinoma, a 99 percent cure rate for carcinomas that are not returning growths. The cure rate when basal cell carcinomas are removed with wide excision can be as high as 98 percent. With curettage and electrodesiccation, the rate is from 91 to 97 percent.

Basal cell carcinoma is not considered life-threatening in almost all cases. It is simply disfiguring.

Staging For Merkel Cell Cancer

Doctors use the TNM system to describe the stage of Merkel cell cancer. Doctors use the results from diagnostic tests and scans to answer these questions:

  • Tumor : How large is the primary tumor? Where is it located?

  • Node : Has the tumor spread to the lymph nodes? If so, where and how many?

  • Metastasis : Has the cancer spread to other parts of the body? If so, where and how much?

The results are combined to determine the stage of Merkel cell cancer for each person.

There are 5 stages: stage 0 and stages I through IV . The stage provides a common way of describing the cancer, so doctors can work together to plan the best treatments.

Stage 0: This is called carcinoma in situ. Cancer cells are found only in the top layers of the skin. The cancer does not involve the lymph nodes, and it has not spread.

Stage I: The primary tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller at its widest part. The cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes or to other parts of the body.

Stage IIA: The tumor is larger than 2 cm and has not spread to the lymph nodes or other parts of the body.

Stage IIB: The tumor has grown into nearby tissues, such as muscles, cartilage, or bone. It has not spread to the lymph nodes or elsewhere in the body.

Stage III: The cancer has spread to the lymph nodes. The tumor can be any size and may have spread to nearby bone, muscle, connective tissue, or cartilage.

Stage IV: The tumor has spread to distant parts of the body, such as the liver, lung, bone, or brain.

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How Is Basal Cell Cancer Of The Head And Neck Diagnosed

Diagnosis is made by clinical exam and a biopsy. Basal cell cancers are staged by size and extent of growth. These cancers rarely metastasize to lymph nodes or other organs, but they can grow quite large and invade small nerves and local structures.

Biopsy can help determine if the basal cell cancer is a low-risk tumor or a high-risk tumor that requires more aggressive treatment. Low-risk tumors are often nodular and do not have nerve involvement. High-risk tumors in the head and neck are those that involve the central face, nose and eye area, as well as those tumors that are greater than or equal to 10 millimeters on the cheeks, scalp and neck tumors that are recurrent or arising from previously radiated tissue and tumors arising in patients who are immunosuppressed. An aggressive growth pattern on the pathology evaluation and perineural invasion are also features of high-risk basal cell cancers.

Can Basal Cell Carcinoma Disappear

Superficial Spreading Basal Cell Carcinoma

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How Dangerous Is A Basal Cell Carcinoma

While melanoma rightly deserves the attention it receives as the most dangerous form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma isnt something to brush off as harmless. Yes, this most common form of skin cancer rarely causes fatalities, but it can become quite disfiguring.

While basal cell carcinoma lesions rarely spread beyond the original tumor site, they should not be allowed to grow freely. These lesions can grow widely, penetrating deeply into the skin destroying skin, tissue, and bone. Plus, the longer you leave a basal cell carcinoma untreated, the more likely it is to come back. And because it will usually return in the same area, this can create problems removing the lesions without overly disfiguring the patient.

Infiltrative Basal Cell Carcinoma

Infiltrative basal cell carcinoma is an aggressive type of skin cancer that requires surgical treatment. Subtypes of infiltrative basal cell lesions include micronodular carcinoma and morpheaform carcinoma.

Causes: Infiltrative forms of basal cell cancer, like those of the nodular and superficial types, are linked to both genetic factors and environmental factors such as prolonged sun exposure in youth.

Symptoms: The symptoms of infiltrative basal cell lesions vary according to subtype. Micronodular lesions are typically firm, yellowish-white in color, and have a distinct border. Morpheaform lesions resemble plaque or scar tissue, have vague and far-reaching borders, and are prone to crusting and bleeding.

Diagnosis and Treatment: A thorough skin biopsy is necessary for this type of basal cell cancer, as infiltrative lesions are visually easy to mistake for other non-cancerous forms of scar tissue. Surgical excision with margin examination, radiation therapy, and Mohs micrographic surgery are the most effective treatment options.

Once a patient has been diagnosed with one of the types of basal cell cancer, he or she can discuss treatment options with medical professionals and can proceed with having the cancer removed. Because several effective basal cell surgical procedures and medication options are available, patients who are diagnosed while the disease is in early stages often have a very good prognosis.

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Treatment Of Basal Cell Carcinoma

  • Removal of the tumor

Doctors may remove the cancer in the office by scraping and burning it with an electric needle or by cutting it out. Doctors may destroy the cancer by using extreme cold .

After removing all of the cancer, doctors decide how best to replace the skin that has been cut away. They may bring the edges of the remaining skin together with sutures or use a skin graft Skin Tissue transplantation is the removal of various tissues, such as skin cells, corneas, cartilage, or bone, from a body and then inserting that tissue into the same or another person who has… read more or skin flap. Or they may place dressings on top of the wound and let the skin heal on its own.

Mohs surgery reduces recurrence rates for skin cancers. This surgery is useful for basal cell and squamous cell cancers but is less often used for melanoma.

How Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated

Basal Cell Carcinomas (Medical Animation Video 3D)

Although squamous cell carcinomas usually grow slowly, it is important to see a dermatologist quickly. “The sooner you see your doctor and the cancer is diagnosed and treated, the less complicated the surgery to remove it will be, and the faster you will make a complete recovery, Dr. Leffell explains. The treatment for squamous cell cancer varies according to the size and location of the lesion. The surgical options are the same as those for basal cell cancer:

  • Surgical excision: Removing a squamous cell lesion is a simple procedure that typically takes place in the dermatologist’s office. After numbing the cancer and the area around it with a local anesthetic, the doctor uses a scalpel to remove the tumor and some of the surrounding skin to make sure all cancer is eliminated. Estimating how much to take requires skill and expertise, Dr. Leffell notes. The risk of taking too little tissue is that some cancer remains taking too much leaves a larger scar than is necessary. Shaped like a football, the wound is stitched together, using plastic surgery techniques. If dissolvable stitches are used, they will disappear on their own as the area heals. Though the procedure leaves some redness and a small scar, it tends to become less noticeable over time. “The cure rate for this type of excision is typically about 90 to 93 percent,” says Dr. Leffell. But, of course, this is dependent on the skill and experience of the doctor.”

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What Are The Symptoms Of Basal Cell Cancer Of The Head And Neck

Basal cell cancers usually present as an abnormal growth on the skin. The growth may have the appearance of a wart, crusty spot, reddish patch, mole, nodule or bump, or a sore that does not heal. It may or may not bleed and can sometimes be painful. These are usually slow-growing tumors that begin as small spots on sun-exposed areas of the face. Because they can have such a range of appearances, any new persistent skin lesion should be evaluated.

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What Happens If A Basal Cell Carcinoma Is Not Treated

Posted on September 26, 2015 in Skin Cancer, Mohs Micrographic Surgery, Practice News, Skin Tumor, Basal Cell Carcinoma, malignancy

A basal cell carcinoma is one of the more common forms of skin cancers and, fortunately, one of the most treatable, says Dr. Adam Mamelak, board certified dermatologist and skin cancer specialist in Austin, Texas.

Basal cell carcinoma is most commonly caused by exposure of the skin to ultraviolet light, either from the sun or a tanning bed. Gradually, the effects of exposure damage the DNA, resulting in the development of cancer. The process can take anywhere from weeks to months to several years before it becomes noticeable.

Basal cell carcinomas can look different. They can appear as tiny, pearl shaped bumps. They can also manifest as shiny red or pink patches that feel slightly scaly. They are fragile and can bleed easily. Some appear to be dark against the surrounding skin, while others will break down and create a sore or ulcer on the skin.

If Dr. Mamelak suspects his patients have a basal cell carcinoma, he often does a biopsy on the growth to see if cancer cells are present. Dr. Mamelak also asks his patients a number of questions about their potential risk factors, including how often they are out in the sun, whether or not they use a tanning bed, and what kind of sunblock they use, if any.

What happens if a basal cell carcinoma is not treated?

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How Is Basal Cell Carcinoma Staged

In rare situations, such as when the original lesion is more than 2 millimeters thick, or when it has invaded the lower layers of the skin, a stage may be assigned. The stages range from zero to four higher numbers indicate more aggressive cancers. Most oncologists use the following scale:

  • Stage 0 basal cell carcinoma These cancers are only present in the epidermis or the upper layer of the skin. They have not spread to any of the deeper layers or lymph nodes.
  • Stage 1 basal cell carcinoma These cancers are smaller than 2 centimeters and have not spread to any nearby lymph nodes or organs, but may have one factor that increases the risk of spreading or recurrence .
  • Stage 2 basal cell carcinoma These cancers are larger than 2 centimeters, and while they have not spread to other organs or lymph nodes, they have two or more factors that make them likely to return or spread.
  • Stage 3 basal cell carcinoma These cancers have spread to local lymph nodes , but not to other organs.
  • Stage 4 basal cell carcinoma These cancers have spread to several lymph nodes, bones or other organs, and they may be any size.

At Moffitt Cancer Center, we treat patients with all stages of basal cell carcinoma. Our skilled oncologists can determine whether a lesion is likely to spread and what treatments are expected to be most beneficial. No referral is necessary to meet with our team call or complete a new patient registration form online.

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What Does It Look Like

Basal cell carcinoma skin cancer

BCCs vary in their appearance. People often become aware of them as an area of discoloured skin, a lump, or area of skin that bleeds, scabs and then refuses to heal. Occasionally they are itchy. Usually BCCs are painless.

There are subtypes of BCC. The subtypes may have a different appearance and may require different treatment.

  • Nodular BCC: Form a nodule with a pearly rim and may have a central crater. Fine blood vessels are visible within the nodule.
  • Superficial BCC: Look like a scaly red patch on the skin with a thin translucent rolled border. Common on the upper trunck and shoulders.
  • Morphoeic BCC: Also known as sclerosing BCC. This resembles a scar with a waxy appearance and indistinct margins it may be subtle. Often this type of BCC is much larger than it initally appears, it may invade deeply and infiltrate nerves .
  • Basosqamous BCC: Mixed BCC and squamous cell carcinoma that is potentially more aggressive than other forms of BCC.

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Who Gets Basal Cell Carcinoma

Risk factors for BCC include:

  • Age and sex: BCCs are particularly prevalent in elderly males. However, they also affect females and younger adults
  • Repeated prior episodes of sunburn
  • Fair skin, blue eyes and blond or red hairnote BCC can also affect darker skin types
  • Previous cutaneous injury, thermal burn, disease
  • Inherited syndromes: BCC is a particular problem for families with basal cell naevus syndrome , Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome, Rombo syndrome, Oley syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum
  • Other risk factors include ionising radiation, exposure to arsenic, and immune suppression due to disease or medicines

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma is a cancer that grows on parts of your skin that get a lot of sun. It’s natural to feel worried when your doctor tells you that you have it, but keep in mind that it’s the least risky type of skin cancer. As long as you catch it early, you can be cured.

This cancer is unlikely to spread from your skin to other parts of your body, but it can move nearby into bone or other tissue under your skin. Several treatments can keep that from happening and get rid of the cancer.

The tumors start off as small shiny bumps, usually on your nose or other parts of your face. But you can get them on any part of your body, including your trunk, legs, and arms. If you’ve got fair skin, you’re more likely to get this skin cancer.

Basal cell carcinoma usually grows very slowly and often doesn’t show up for many years after intense or long-term exposure to the sun. You can get it at a younger age if you’re exposed to a lot of sun or use tanning beds.

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Skin Cancer Risk Factors

The primary risk factor for skin cancer of all types is the amount of time a person spends outside or in tanning beds, especially if he or she does not wear sunscreen and protective clothing. Other risk factors are:

  • Fair skin that burns and freckles easily
  • Naturally blonde or red hair
  • Green or blue eyes
  • History of sunburns
  • Geography places at high altitudes and or with abundant sunshine year-round have more incidences of skin cancer
  • History of previous skin cancers
  • Weak immune system from other illnesses

Can Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma Spread

Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) Skin Cancer

Nodular basal cell carcinoma is unlikely to spread, as these specific tumors grow very slowly and usually stay restricted to the skin. However, depending on the placement of your nodular basal cell carcinoma, the growing tumor may have detrimental effects on nearby body parts, especially if one develops near your:

  • Eyes

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How Serious Is My Cancer

If you have skin cancer, the doctor will want to find out how far it has spread. This is called staging.

Basal and squamous cell skin cancers don’t spread as often as some other types of cancer, so the exact stage might not be too important. Still, your doctor might want to find out the stage of your cancer to help decide what type of treatment is best for you.

The stage describes the growth or spread of the cancer through the skin. It also tells if the cancer has spread to other parts of your body that are close by or farther away.

Your cancer can be stage 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4. The lower the number, the less the cancer has spread. A higher number, like stage 4, means a more serious cancer that has spread beyond the skin. Be sure to ask the doctor about the cancer stage and what it means for you.

Other things can also help you and your doctor decide how to treat your cancer, such as:

  • Where the cancer is on your body
  • How fast the cancer has been growing
  • If the cancer is causing symptoms, such as being painful or itchy
  • If the cancer is in a place that was already treated with radiation
  • If you have a weakened immune system

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