HomeCarcinomaHow Serious Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

How Serious Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

Squamous Cell Cancer [Dermatology]

Squamous cell carcinoma in situ, also called Bowens Disease, is a cancer of the squamous cells that has not yet become invasive. Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common skin cancers, second only to basal cell carcinoma, and can affect any part of the body, especially those most exposed to sunlight, toxins, or human papillomavirus . Because it is not yet invasive, squamous cell carcinoma in situ is very treatable and can often be completely removed.

A carcinoma is any cancer of the epithelial cells. Epithelial cells line the organs, including skin, make up some glands, and are one of the main cell types in the body. Squamous cells are a type of epithelial cell present in the inside of the mouth, skin, anal canal, vagina, tongue, urinary bladder, prostate, cervix, esophagus, lungs, and blood vessels.

Effective Options For Early Stage Scc

Most squamous cell carcinomas of the skin can be cured when found and treated early. Treatment should happen as soon as possible after diagnosis, since more advanced SCCs of the skin are more difficult to treat and can become dangerous, spreading to local lymph nodes, distant tissues and organs. Find out more about treatment options for advanced or recurring SCCs here.

If youve been diagnosed with an SCC that has not spread, there are several effective treatments that can usually be performed on an outpatient basis. The choices available to you depend on the tumor type, size, location and depth, as well as your age and overall health.

Options include:

Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factors

Certain things make you more likely to develop SCC:

  • Older age
  • Blue, green, or gray eyes
  • Blonde or red hair
  • Spend time outside, exposed to the sun’s UV Rays
  • History of sunburns, precancerous spots on your skin, or skin cancer
  • Tanning beds and bulbs
  • Long-term exposure to chemicals such as arsenic in the water
  • Bowens disease, HPV, HIV, or AIDS

Your doctor may refer you to a dermatologist who specializes in skin conditions. They will:

  • Ask about your medical history
  • Ask about your history of severe sunburns or indoor tanning
  • Ask if you have any pain or other symptoms
  • Ask when the spot first appeared
  • Give you a physical exam to check the size, shape, color, and texture of the spot
  • Look for other spots on your body
  • Feel your lymph nodes to make sure they arent bigger or harder than normal

If your doctor thinks a bump looks questionable, theyll remove a sample of the spot to send to a lab for testing.

Continued

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Which Is Worse Basal Cell Or Squamous Cell Cancer

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Can SCC turn into melanoma? Squamous cells: These are flat cells in the upper part of the epidermis, which are constantly shed as new ones form. When these cells grow out of control, they can develop into squamous cell skin cancer . Melanoma skin cancer starts in these cells.

What Is Intraepidermalsquamous Cell Carcinoma

Intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma is a common superficial form of keratinocytecancer. It is also known as Bowen disease, intraepidermal carcinoma and carcinoma in situ .

Intraepidermal SCC is derived from squamous cells, the flat epidermal cells that make keratin, the horny protein that makes up skin, hair and nails. Intraepidermal and in situ mean the malignant cells are confined to the tissue of origin, in this case, the epidermis.

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Where Do Skin Cancers Start

Most skin cancers start in the top layer of skin, called the epidermis. There are 3 main types of cells in this layer:

  • Squamous cells: These are flat cells in the upper part of the epidermis, which are constantly shed as new ones form. When these cells grow out of control, they can develop into squamous cell skin cancer .
  • Basal cells: These cells are in the lower part of the epidermis, called the basal cell layer. These cells constantly divide to form new cells to replace the squamous cells that wear off the skins surface. As these cells move up in the epidermis, they get flatter, eventually becoming squamous cells. Skin cancers that start in the basal cell layer are called basal cell skin cancers or basal cell carcinomas.
  • Melanocytes: These cells make the brown pigment called melanin, which gives the skin its tan or brown color. Melanin acts as the bodys natural sunscreen, protecting the deeper layers of the skin from some of the harmful effects of the sun. Melanoma skin cancer starts in these cells.

The epidermis is separated from the deeper layers of skin by the basement membrane. When a skin cancer becomes more advanced, it generally grows through this barrier and into the deeper layers.

What Are The Clinical Features Of Intraepidermal Scc

Intraepidermal SCC presents as one or more irregular scalyplaques of up to several centimetres in diameter. They are often an orange-red colour but may also be brown.

Although intraepidermal SCC may arise on any area of skin, it is most often diagnosed on sun-exposed sites of the ears, face, hands and lower legs. When there are many plaques, distribution is not symmetrical .

Intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma

Intraepidermal SCC may start to grow under a nail when it results in a red streak that later may destroy the nail plate.

Intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma of the nail

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Does Fluorouracil Work On Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Treatment

  • Mohs Surgery. Mohs surgery has the highest cure rate of all therapies for squamous cell carcinomas.
  • Curettage and Electrodessication. This very common treatment for squamous cell carcinoma is most effective for low-risk tumors.
  • Cryosurgery.
  • Laser Surgery.

Beside above, is Squamous Cell Carcinoma an aggressive cancer? Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Furthermore, what type of chemo is used for squamous cell carcinoma?

One drug that is commonly used for topical chemotherapy to treat squamous cell carcinoma is fluorouracil .

What is the survival rate for squamous cell carcinoma?

The 5-year survival rates were 62% for patients with stage I disease, 80% for patients with stage II disease, 42% for patients with stage III, and 19% for patients with stage IV disease.

Looking After Your Skin After Treatment

Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ (Bowen’s Disease) with Clear Cell Change: 5-Minute Pathology Pearls

After treatment, you may need follow-up appointments with your dermatologist or GP to see if you need any further treatment.

If you had surgery, you may need to have any stitches removed at your GP surgery a few weeks later.

After treatment:

  • see a GP if an existing patch starts to bleed, change in appearance or develops a lump do not wait for your follow-up appointment
  • see a GP if you notice any worrying new patches on your skin
  • make sure you protect your skin from the sun wear protective clothing and use a sunscreen with a high sun protection factor of at least 30

Page last reviewed: 21 May 2019 Next review due: 21 May 2022

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Squamous Cell Skin Cancer

Other names Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma , epidermoid carcinoma, squamous cell epithelioma
SCC of the skin tends to arise from pre-malignant lesions, actinic keratoses surface is usually scaly and often ulcerates .
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Squamous-cell skin cancer, also known as cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma , is one of the main types of skin cancer along with basal cell cancer, and melanoma. It usually presents as a hard lump with a scaly top but can also form an ulcer. Onset is often over months. Squamous-cell skin cancer is more likely to spread to distant areas than basal cell cancer. When confined to the outermost layer of the skin, a precancerous or in situ form of cSCC is known as Bowen’s disease.

The greatest risk factor is high total exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Other risks include prior scars, chronic wounds, actinic keratosis, lighter skin, Bowen’s disease, arsenic exposure, radiation therapy, tobacco smoking, poor immune system function, previous basal cell carcinoma, and HPV infection. Risk from UV radiation is related to total exposure, rather than early exposure.Tanning beds are becoming another common source of ultraviolet radiation. Risk is also elevated in certain genetic skin disorders, such as xeroderma pigmentosum and certain forms of epidermolysis bullosa. It begins from squamous cells found within the skin. Diagnosis is often based on skin examination and confirmed by tissue biopsy.

When To Get Medical Advice

See a GP if you have a persistent red, scaly patch of skin and do not know the cause.

It’s important to get a proper diagnosis, as Bowen’s disease can look like other conditions, such as psoriasis or eczema.

If necessary, your GP will refer you to a skin specialist to determine what the problem is.

If your GP is not sure about the cause, they may need to remove a small sample of skin so it can be looked at more closely .

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Symptoms Of Bowen’s Disease

Bowen’s disease usually appears as a patch on the skin that has clear edges and does not heal.

Some people have more than 1 patch.

  • up to a few centimetres across
  • itchy

The patch can appear anywhere on the skin, but is especially common on exposed areas like the lower legs, neck and head.

Sometimes they can affect the groin area and, in men, the penis.

If the patch bleeds, starts to turn into an open sore or develops a lump, it could be a sign it’s turned into squamous cell skin cancer.

Treating Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Most of squamous cell carcinomas can be cured if they are treated early. Once squamous cell carcinoma has spread beyond the skin, though, less than half of people live five years, even with aggressive treatment.

There are many ways to treat squamous cell carcinoma that has not spread. These include:

  • cutting away the cancer and a small amount of healthy tissue around it. If a large area of skin is removed, a skin graft may be necessary.
  • scraping away the cancer with a surgical tool. An electric probe is used to kill any cancerous cells left behind.
  • freezing cancer cells with liquid nitrogen. This treatment is usually used only for very small tumors or for a patch of skin that looks abnormal but isn’t yet cancerous.
  • destroying the tumor with radiation.
  • shaving away the cancer, one thin layer at a time. Each layer is examined under the microscope as it is removed. This technique helps the doctor preserve as much healthy skin as possible.
  • applying drugs directly to the skin or injecting them into the tumor
  • using a narrow laser beam to destroy the cancer.

The treatment that is best for you depends on the size and location of the cancer, whether it has returned after previous treatment, your age, and your general health.

Once your treatment is finished, it’s important to have regular follow-up skin exams. Your doctor may want to see you every three months for the first year, for example, and then less often after that.

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Meaning Of Carcinoma In Situ

In many ways, the term “carcinoma” is simply equated with cancer. Roughly 85 percent of cancers are carcinomas. Carcinomas are composed of epithelial cells the type of cells that line the skin, breast ducts, and other surfaces of organs in the body.

The subtypes of carcinomas include adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, transitional cell carcinoma , and basal cell carcinoma.

Carcinoma in situ can be further defined by the tissue type in which cancer is beginning. For example, squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the cervix would represent a cancer that had started in squamous cells which line the cervix and has not yet become invasive.

Tumors such as sarcomas arise in tissues which do not have a basement membrane so that for these types of cancer there is not a stage of carcinoma in situ. In other words, tumors such as bone cancer do not have a pre-invasive stage and the cells would either be considered normal or cancer. Likewise, blood-related cancers, such as leukemias and lymphomas, do not have a preinvasive but cancerous stage for which people can be screened. For cancers that don’t have a CIS stage, screening tests are not as effective in early detection, because once the abnormal cells are detected, it would already be considered invasive with the potential to spread .

Bowens Disease Or Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

Squamous cell carcinoma in situ is the earliest recognizable form of squamous cell skin cancer This condition is also referred to as stage 0 squamous cell carcinoma, on the scale from 0 to IV. There are typically no visible symptoms. When symptoms are present, a scaly condition may be present, and the skin may seem to catch on clothing. The presence of abnormal cells may be detected by a pathologist. Although the cancerous cells have not yet invaded the deeper layers of the skin and the condition is not considered a serious condition, treatment at this early stage is generally recommended to help prevent this condition from developing into squamous cell carcinoma. In some cases, monitoring may be prescribed.

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How Will Your Doctor Diagnose Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Your doctor will first examine the area in question, looking for things such as: the size, whether or not the borders are clearly or poorly defined, and location, including whether or not the spot is situated on top of a previous injury. The next step is a biopsy, which is the removal of tissue for examination under a microscope. If a tumor is considered to be high-risk, your doctor might order imaging scans to determine if nearby lymph nodes are involved or if the tumor has invaded other tissue in the area.

What Does Squamous Cell Cancer Look Like

How dangerous is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous cell carcinomas may appear as flat reddish or brownish patches in the skin, often with a rough, scaly, or crusted surface. They tend to grow slowly and usually occur on sun-exposed areas of the body, such as the face, ears, neck, lips, and backs of the hands. Normal moles also develop from these skin cells.

What is the best treatment for squamous cell carcinoma? Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Treatment Mohs Surgery. Mohs surgery has the highest cure rate of all therapies for squamous cell carcinomas. Curettage and Electrodessication. This very common treatment for squamous cell carcinoma is most effective for low-risk tumors. Cryosurgery. Laser Surgery.

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stages

There are certain features that are considered to make the cancer at higher risk for spreading or recurrence, and these may also be used to stage squamous cell carcinomas. These include:

  • Greater than 2 mm in thickness
  • Invasion into the lower dermis or subcutis layers of the skin
  • Invasion into the tiny nerves in the skin
  • Location on the ear or on a hair-bearing lip

After the TNM components and risk factors have been established, the cancer is assigned to one of the five squamous cell carcinoma stages, which are labeled 0 to 4. The characteristics and stages of squamous cell cancer are:

Stage 0: Also called carcinoma in situ, cancer discovered in this stage is only present in the epidermis and has not spread deeper to the dermis.

Stage 1 squamous cell carcinoma: The cancer is less than 2 centimeters, about 4/5 of an inch across, has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or organs, and has one or fewer high-risk features.

Stage 2 squamous cell carcinoma: The cancer is larger than 2 centimeters across, and has not spread to nearby organs or lymph nodes, or a tumor of any size with 2 or more high risk features.

Stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma: The cancer has spread into facial bones or 1 nearby lymph node, but not to other organs.

Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma: The cancer can be any size and has spread to 1 or more lymph nodes which are larger than 3 cm and may have spread to bones or other organs in the body.

What Causes Intraepidermal Scc

Ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of intraepidermal SCC. It damages the skin cell nucleic acids , resulting in a mutantclone of the genep53, setting off uncontrolled growth of the skin cells. UV also suppresses the immune response, preventing recovery from damage.

Human papillomavirus is another major cause of intraepidermal SCC. Oncogenic strains of HPV are the main cause of squamous intraepithelial lesions , that is, squamous cell carcinoma in situ in mucosal tissue.

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treatment

Squamous cell carcinomas detected at an early stage and removed promptly are almost always curable and cause minimal damage. However, left untreated, they may grow to the point of being very difficult to treat.

A small percentage may even metastasize to distant tissues and organs. Your doctor can help you determine if a particular SCC is at increased risk for metastasis and may need treatment beyond simple excision.

Fortunately, there are several effective ways to treat squamous cell carcinoma. The choice of treatment is based on the type, size, location, and depth of penetration of the tumor, as well as the patients age and general health. Squamous cell carcinoma treatment can almost always be performed on an outpatient basis.