Saturday, December 3, 2022
HomeCarcinomaWhat Kind Of Cancer Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma

What Kind Of Cancer Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma

How Do People Find Bcc On Their Skin

Squamous Cell Carcinoma: What Patients Need to Know

Many people find it when they notice a spot, lump, or scaly patch on their skin that is growing or feels different from the rest of their skin. If you notice any spot on your skin that is growing, bleeding, or changing in any way, see a board-certified dermatologist. These doctors have the most training and experience in diagnosing skin cancer.

To find skin cancer early, dermatologists recommend that everyone check their own skin with a skin self-exam. This is especially important for people who have a higher risk of developing BCC. Youll find out what can increase your risk of getting this skin cancer at, Basal cell carcinoma: Who gets and causes.

Images used with permission of:

  • The American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides.

  • J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 80:303-17.

Dont Miss: What Are The 4 Types Of Melanoma

How Serious Is A Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Id had a few skin cancers removed before, all basal cell carcinomas , the most common type. But when I was diagnosed with a squamous cell carcinoma on my scalp, it seemed different, and a little more scary. I asked C. William Hanke, MD, a Mohs surgeon at the Laser and Skin Surgery Center of Indiana and a senior vice president of The Skin Cancer Foundation, what we need to know about this second most common form of skin cancer.

Q: When people talk about nonmelanoma skin cancers, they tend to lump basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas together as the ones that are far less dangerous than melanoma. Should we take SCCs more seriously?

Dr. Hanke: Yes and no. BCCs hardly ever metastasize. Ive seen two cases in my entire career. But when SCCs that havent been treated early get big, then the chance of metastasis becomes real. Its uncommon, but its much more common than in BCC. We see it in our practice. But we dont want to scare people into thinking that just because they have squamous cell, Oh wow, Ive got a chance of metastasis. Remember, the rate is very low. Its just those big ones.

Q: OK, so its rare. But what happens when an SCC does spread?

Q: Whats the usual treatment for SCCs?

Q: How can we detect SCCs as early as possible?

What You Can Do

Examine yourself head to toe once a month: Keep an eye out for new or changing lesions that grow, bleed, or do not heal. Learn how to check your skin here.

When in doubt, check it out. Follow your instincts and visit your doctor if you see a spot that just doesnt seem right.

See your dermatologist for a professional skin exam every year even if you dont see anything suspicious. These specialists are skilled at identifying and treating abnormal skin growths that may be undetectable to the untrained eye and can check areas of your body that are difficult for you to see yourself.

Follow up regularly: Especially if youve already had either SCC or basal cell carcinoma , melanoma or precancers like actinic keratosis, be sure to see your dermatologist for a skin exam at recommended intervals.

Practice sun safety: Making daily sun protection a part of your lifestyle is the single most effective way to reduce your risk of developing skin cancer.

Reviewed by:

Recommended Reading: Can You Have Skin Cancer And Not Know It

Types Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

There are several types of squamous cell carcinoma. Some are more likely to spread than others, but in general, most share similar characteristics. The primary difference between each subtype is histological .

To determine which type of squamous cell carcinoma a patient has, a pathologist will examine a tissue sample underneath a microscope. By identifying the type of cells that are present in a lesion, an oncologist can tailor a patients treatment plan to achieve the best possible outcome and quality of life.

The primary types of squamous cell carcinoma are:

  • Adenoid/pseudoglandular squamous cell carcinoma
  • Large cell keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma
  • Large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma
  • Lymphoepithelial carcinoma
  • Small cell keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma
  • Spindle cell squamous cell carcinoma
  • Verrucous squamous-cell carcinoma

At Moffitt Cancer Center, we diagnose and treat a complete range of skin cancers, including the unique variants of squamous cell carcinoma. Screening, staging and long-term follow-up services are also available as part of our commitment to providing comprehensive care.

Referrals are not required to seek a diagnosis or treatment at Moffitt. If youve been diagnosed with or are concerned that you are showing signs of one of the different types of squamous cell carcinoma, call or submit a new patient registration form online.

  • BROWSE

Radiation Therapy For Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Keratoacanthoma (Squamous cell carcinoma of the ...

External beam radiation has been used for decades to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer, including SCC. While less than 1% of cases are treated with radiation currently, a recent body of evidence has verified the effectiveness of the technique with high success rates and low complication rates.

Superficial radiation strategies are especially convenient for patients on blood thinners, those with complicated lesions around the face, or those with multiple lesions where extensive surgery would be disfiguring or debilitating.

Many times a multi-discipline approach using the skills of the dermatologist, Mohs surgeon, and radiation oncologist can bring about the best customized option for individual patients.

Skip the surgery. Learn more about radiation therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

Read Also: How To Determine Skin Cancer

Basal Cell And Squamous Cell Carcinoma

The two most common kinds of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, which are sometimes called nonmelanoma skin cancer. These cancers are carcinomas that begin in the cells that cover or line an organ.

Basal cell carcinoma accounts for more than 90 percent of all skin cancers in the United States and is the most common of all cancers. Typically, it is a slow-growing cancer that seldom spreads to other parts of the body.

Squamous cell carcinoma also rarely spreads, but does so more often than basal cell carcinoma. It is important that skin cancers are found and treated early because they can invade and destroy nearby tissue. Organ transplant recipients have a 65-fold higher risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma than others. UCSF Medical Center offers a High Risk Skin Cancer Clinic for those at high risk for non-melanoma skin cancers, such as transplant recipients.

What Kills Skin Cancer Cells

Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect humans. It can be caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet light or prolonged sunburns, but many skin cancer cases are linked to genetics and family history. What Kills Skin Cancer Cells? There may not be a definitive cure for cancer, however, there are treatment options available depending on what type of cancer is being diagnosed. Some treatment options for skin cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and immunotherapy.

In addition to these traditional treatments, there are some natural remedies that can help treat cancer cells as well: turmeric, cannabis oil, and honey.

You May Like: How Is Early Melanoma Treated

Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treatment

Squamous cell carcinoma can usually be treated with minor surgery that can be done in a doctors office or hospital clinic. Depending on the size and location of the SCC, your doctor may choose different techniques to remove it.

For small skin cancers:

  • Curettage and electrodessication : removing the top layer of the skin cancer then using an electronic needle to kill cancer cells
  • Laser therapy: an intense light destroys the growth
  • : a photosensitizing solution applied to your skin then activated with a light or daylight, or sometimes with intense pulsed light
  • Cryosurgery: freezing of the spot using liquid nitrogen

For larger skin cancers:

  • Excision: cutting out the cancer spot and some healthy skin around it, then stitching up the wound
  • Mohs surgery: excision and then inspecting the excised skin using a microscope this requires stitching up the wound

How Is Squamous Cell Cancer Diagnosed

Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Treatment Options

Your doctor will first perform a physical exam and inspect any abnormal areas for signs of SCC. Theyll also ask you about your medical history. If SCC is suspected, your doctor may decide to take a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis.

A biopsy usually involves removing a very small portion of the affected skin. The skin sample is then sent to a laboratory for testing.

In some cases, your doctor may need to remove a larger part or all of the abnormal growth for testing. Talk to your doctor about any potential scarring or biopsy concerns.

Treatment for SCC varies. Treatment is based on:

  • the extent and severity of your cancer
  • your age
  • your overall health
  • the location of the cancer

If SCC is caught early, the condition can usually be successfully treated. It becomes harder to cure once it has spread. Many treatments can be performed as in-office procedures.

Some doctors may also use photodynamic therapy, laser surgery, and topical medications to treat SCC. However, the Food and Drug Administration hasnt approved these methods for treating SCC:

Once SCC has been treated, its critical to attend all follow-up visits with your doctor. SCC can return, and its important to monitor your skin for any precancerous or cancerous areas at least once per month.

Don’t Miss: How To Know If It’s Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer Types: Squamous Cell Carcinoma Overview

All content solely developed by the American Academy of Dermatology

The American Academy of Dermatology gratefully acknowledges the support from Sanofi Genzyme and Regeneron.

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

What is squamous cell carcinoma of the skin?A common type of skin cancer, squamous cell skin cancer can develop from a pre-cancerous skin growth called an actinic keratosis .

Is it contagious? No

How Common Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Over 1 million people are diagnosed with SCC in the US each year. The incidence of SCC has risen about 200 percent over the past 30 years. There are more than 15,000 deaths each year in the US from SCC. Excluding head and neck SCC and CSCC in situ, about 200,000-400,000 new cases of SCC are diagnosed in the US every year, resulting in about 3,000 deaths.

Men are about two times more likely than women to develop SCCs. People over the age of 50 are most likely to get SCCs, but the incidence has been rising in younger people.

Recommended Reading: Where Can Skin Cancer Spread

How Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated

It is usually possible to completely remove an SCC. The best type oftreatment for you will depend on the size of the SCC and where it is.

Usually, the doctor will remove an SCC using simple skin surgery. Theywill then look at the area under a microscope to check all the cancer has beenremoved. If it has spread, you might need radiotherapy afterwards.

Other ways of removing the SCC are:

  • scraping it off then sealing the base of the wound with an electric needle or liquid nitrogen
  • using a laser to burn the SCC away
  • freezing it off
  • Applying creams, liquids or lotions directly onto the SCC. Sometimes the doctor will shine a light on the area to make the medicine work

After treatment, you will need follow-up appointments with your doctor. You will be at greater risk of developing another skin cancer, so its more important than ever to protect your skin from the sun.

What Is Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Of The Head And Neck

What Is Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma? Symptoms ...

Skin malignancies are the most common cancer in the United States, responsible for more than half of all new cancer cases. These can be broken down into melanoma and non-melanoma malignancies, which are squamous cell cancer and basal cell cancer. These skin malignancies are caused by ultraviolet radiation from exposure to the sun and tanning beds.

Squamous cell cancer is the second most common form of skin cancer. It is more aggressive and may require extensive surgery depending on location and nerve involvement. Radiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy are used in advanced cases.

You May Like: How To Tell If Something Is Skin Cancer

Who Is Most Likely To Have A Squamous Cell Carcinoma

The following groups of people are at greater risk of developing SCC:

  • Immunosuppressed individuals either due to medical treatment, such as methotrexate, ciclosporin and azathioprine, or due to diseases which affect immune function, including inherited diseases of the immune system or acquired conditions such as leukaemia or HIV
  • Patients who have had an organ transplant because of the treatment required to suppress their immune systems to prevent organ rejection
  • People who are more susceptible to sunburn
  • People who have had significant cumulative ultraviolet light exposure, for example:
  • people who have lived in countries near to the equator, or who have been posted to work in these countries, e.g. military personnel, construction workers
  • outdoor workers, such as builders, farmers
  • people of advanced years, who have had a lifetime of frequent sun exposure
  • People with skin conditions such as albinism and xeroderma pigmentosum that make them more susceptible to SCC.
  • Head And Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas make up the vast majority of head and neck cancers and rank as the sixth most common cancer worldwide , with 45,660 new cases of HNSCC diagnosed in 2007 and 35,720 new cases reported in the US during 2009 . They are a group of tumor entities that arise from squamous mucosal surfaces, including nasal cavities, paranasal sinuses, oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx. In contrast to the declining overall incidence of HNSCC, which is mainly due to smoking prevention and cessation , oropharynx carcinoma shows a rising incidence, particularly among individuals less than 45 years of age, suggesting some nontraditional behavioral and environmental factors play a key role in its epidemiology. HNSCC has a 75% overall 5-year survival rate if detected early . Despite advances in detection and treatments over recent decades, most patients present with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, reducing the overall 5-year survival rate to 35% . Late diagnosis, formation of additional primary tumors, and metastases largely contribute to this poor survival rate .

    Also Check: How Do You Know If You Have Melanoma

    How Is Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Treated

    Although squamous cell cancers usually grow slowly, it is important to see a dermatologist quickly. “The sooner you see your doctor and the cancer is diagnosed and treated, the less complicated the surgery to remove it will be, and the faster you will make a complete recovery, Dr. Leffell explains. The treatment for squamous cell cancer varies according to the size and location of the lesion. The surgical options are the same as those for basal cell cancer:

    • Surgical excision: Removing a squamous cell lesion is a simple procedure that typically takes place in the dermatologist’s office. After numbing the cancer and the area around it with a local anesthetic, the doctor uses a scalpel to remove the tumor and some of the surrounding skin to make sure all cancer is eliminated. Estimating how much to take requires skill and expertise, Dr. Leffell notes. The risk of taking too little tissue is that some cancer remains taking too much leaves a larger scar than is necessary. Shaped like a football, the wound is stitched together, using plastic surgery techniques. If dissolvable stitches are used, they will disappear on their own as the area heals. Though the procedure leaves some redness and a small scar, it tends to become less noticeable over time. “The cure rate for this type of excision is typically about 90 to 93 percent,” says Dr. Leffell. But, of course, this is dependent on the skill and experience of the doctor.”

    Moffitt Cancer Centers Approach To Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    At Moffitt Cancer Center, we take a comprehensive, multispecialty approach to diagnosing and treating squamous cell carcinoma. Our Cutaneous Oncology Program makes it possible for patients to consult with a number of specialists in a single location. Our team consists of:

    • Dermatologists
    • Supportive care providers
    • Medical oncologists

    Because these providers work exclusively toward the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer, they have extensive experience and can provide each patient with an effective, individualized treatment plan. At Moffitt, we offer a complete range of treatments for squamous cell carcinoma, from Mohs micrographic surgery to targeted radiation therapy. Cryotherapy and dermabrasion are also options available to our patients. We individualize each patients treatment plan to reflect his or her specific diagnosis and personal preferences, while taking care to consider aesthetic outcomes and important factors related to quality of life.

    Theres no need to obtain a referral to receive treatment at Moffitt. To learn more, call or submit a new patient registration form online.

    You May Like: How To Tell If Skin Cancer Is Melanoma

    What Is A Squamous Cell Carcinoma Of The Skin

    Squamous cell carcinoma is a tumor of skin cells. As shown in the illustration, the skin is made up of several layers of cells with the squamous layer at the top. Given that this type of cancer arises from squamous cells, tumors can develop anywhere that these cells are present. This can include the nail bed, ear tips , nose, and corner of the eyes.

    Squamous cell carcinomas usually present as a single, solitary lesion in one location, but there is a kind of SCC called multicentric squamous cell carcinoma that presents as many lesions in multiple locations on the body, including the mouth. Multicentric SCC is rare in cats.

    What Are The Treatments For Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Your doctor will help you to decide on the best type of treatment. Factors in the decision include your overall health and age, the location of the cancer, and how invasive the cancer is.

    Treatment options include:

    • Scratching off with a curette, an instrument that may end in a ring or a spoon, and then burning with a special electric needle. This method is called electrodessication and curettage.
    • Surgical removal:
    • Mohs surgery: This is a specialized technique. The doctor first removes the visible cancer and then begins cutting around the edges. The tissues are examined during the surgery until no more cancer cells are found in tissues around the wound. If necessary, a skin graft or flap might be applied to help the wound heal.
    • Excisional surgery: The growth and a bit of surrounding skin is removed with a scalpel.
  • Freezing .
  • Applying chemotherapy medication to the skin.
  • Using lasers.
  • Using blue light and a light-sensitive agent applied to the skin .
  • Using radiation .
  • If you have some type of advanced or very invasive SCC, you might find that it returns or metastasizes . There are several medications which have been approved to treat locally advanced cancers that cannot be simply treated or those that have spread to other areas of the body.

    Read Also: How To Say Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    RELATED ARTICLES

    Popular Articles