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What Kind Of Cancer Is Melanoma

Cancer May Spread From Where It Began To Other Parts Of The Body

Skin Cancer: What Causes it and Who is at Risk? – Mayo Clinic

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if melanoma spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually melanoma cells. The disease is metastatic melanoma, not lung cancer.

New Types Of Treatment Are Being Tested In Clinical Trials

This summary section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. Information about clinical trials is available from the NCI website.

Vaccine therapy

Vaccine therapy is a cancer treatment that uses a substance or group of substances to stimulate the immune system to find the tumor and kill it. Vaccine therapy is being studied in the treatment of stage III melanoma that can be removed by surgery.

Types Of Melanoma Skin Cancer

Melanoma skin cancer can grow into and destroy nearby tissue. It can also spread to other parts of the body. Melanoma skin cancer is also called cutaneous melanoma and malignant melanoma of the skin.

There are 4 main types of melanoma skin cancer superficial spreading, nodular, lentigo maligna and acral lentiginous.

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When To Seek Medical Care For Skin Cancer

Many people, especially those who have fair coloring or have had extensive sun exposure, periodically check their entire body for suspicious moles and lesions.

Have your primary health care provider or a dermatologist check any moles or spots that concern you.

See your health care provider to check your skin if you notice any changes in the size, shape, color, or texture of pigmented areas .

If you have skin cancer, your skin specialist or cancer specialist will talk to you about symptoms of metastatic disease that might require care in a hospital.

Signs Of Melanoma Include A Change In The Way A Mole Or Pigmented Area Looks

Top 10 Risk Factors for Skin Cancer  Apex Dermatology ...

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by melanoma or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • A mole that:
  • changes in size, shape, or color.
  • has irregular edges or borders.
  • is more than one color.
  • is asymmetrical .
  • itches.
  • oozes, bleeds, or is ulcerated .
  • A change in pigmented skin.
  • Satellite moles .
  • For pictures and descriptions of common moles and melanoma, see Common Moles, Dysplastic Nevi, and Risk of Melanoma.

    Also Check: Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Prognosis

    What Is A Melanocyte

    Melanocytes are skin cells found in the upper layer of skin. They produce a pigment known as melanin, which gives skin its color. There are two types of melanin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. When skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiation from the sun or tanning beds, it causes skin damage that triggers the melanocytes to produce more melanin, but only the eumelanin pigment attempts to protect the skin by causing the skin to darken or tan. Melanoma occurs when DNA damage from burning or tanning due to UV radiation triggers changes in the melanocytes, resulting in uncontrolled cellular growth.

    About Melanin

    Naturally darker-skinned people have more eumelanin and naturally fair-skinned people have more pheomelanin. While eumelanin has the ability to protect the skin from sun damage, pheomelanin does not. Thats why people with darker skin are at lower risk for developing melanoma than fair-skinned people who, due to lack of eumelanin, are more susceptible to sun damage, burning and skin cancer.

    Remission And The Chance Of Recurrence

    A remission is when cancer cannot be detected in the body and there are no symptoms. This may also be called having no evidence of disease or NED.

    A remission may be temporary or permanent. This uncertainty causes many people to worry that the cancer will come back. While many remissions are permanent, it is important to talk with your doctor about the possibility of the cancer returning. Understanding your risk of recurrence and the treatment options may help you feel more prepared if the cancer does return. Learn more about coping with the fear of recurrence.

    If the melanoma returns after the original treatment, it is called recurrent cancer. It may come back in the same place , nearby , or in another part of the body .

    When this occurs, a new cycle of testing will begin to learn as much as possible about the recurrence. After this testing is done, you and your doctor will talk about the treatment options. Often the treatment plan will include the treatments described above, such as surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, and radiation therapy, but they may be used in a different combination or given at a different pace. Your doctor may suggest clinical trials that are studying new ways to treat this type of recurrent cancer. Whichever treatment plan you choose, palliative care will be important for relieving symptoms and side effects.

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    Surgery For Skin Cancer

    Small skin cancer lesions may be removed through a variety of techniques, including simple excision , electrodesiccation and curettage , and cryosurgery .

    Larger tumors, lesions in high-risk locations, recurrent tumors, and lesions in cosmetically sensitive areas are removed by a technique called Mohs micrographic surgery. For this technique, the surgeon carefully removes tissue, layer by layer, until cancer-free tissue is reached.

    Malignant melanoma is treated more aggressively than just surgical removal. To ensure the complete removal of this dangerous malignancy, 1-2 cm of normal-appearing skin surrounding the tumor is also removed. Depending on the thickness of the melanoma, neighboring lymph nodes may also be removed and tested for cancer. The sentinel lymph node biopsy method uses a mildly radioactive substance to identify which lymph nodes are most likely to be affected.

    Continued

    What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer

    The 4 Stages of Melanoma: The Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer – Mayo Clinic

    Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that develops when melanocytes start to grow out of control.

    Cancer starts when cells in the body begin to grow out of control. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer, and can then spread to other areas of the body. To learn more about cancer and how it starts and spreads, see What Is Cancer?

    Melanoma is much less common than some other types of skin cancers. But melanoma is more dangerous because its much more likely to spread to other parts of the body if not caught and treated early.

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    Benign Tumors That Start In Melanocytes

    A mole is a benign skin tumor that develops from melanocytes. Almost everyone has some moles. Nearly all moles are harmless, but having some types can raise your risk of melanoma. See Risk Factors for Melanoma Skin Cancer for more information about moles.

    A Spitz nevus is a kind of mole that sometimes looks like melanoma. Its more common in children and teens, but it can also be seen in adults. These tumors are typically benign and dont spread. But sometimes doctors have trouble telling Spitz nevi from true melanomas, even when looking at them under a microscope. Therefore, they are often removed, just to be safe.

    Unusual Moles Exposure To Sunlight And Health History Can Affect The Risk Of Melanoma

    Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk.

    Risk factors for melanoma include the following:

    • Having a fair complexion, which includes the following:
    • Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not tan, or tans poorly.
    • Blue or green or other light-colored eyes.
    • Red or blond hair.
  • Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight .
  • Being exposed to certain factors in the environment . Some of the environmental risk factors for melanoma are radiation, solvents, vinyl chloride, and PCBs.
  • Having a history of many blistering sunburns, especially as a child or teenager.
  • Having several large or many small moles.
  • Having a family history of unusual moles .
  • Having a family or personal history of melanoma.
  • Being White.
  • Having a weakened immune system.
  • Having certain changes in the genes that are linked to melanoma.
  • Being White or having a fair complexion increases the risk of melanoma, but anyone can have melanoma, including people with dark skin.

    See the following PDQ summaries for more information on risk factors for melanoma:

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    Risk Factors For Metastatic Melanomas

    You cannot get metastatic melanoma without first having melanoma, though the primary melanoma may be so small its undetectable. Major risk factors for melanomas include:

    • Light skin, light-colored hair or light-colored eyes
    • Skin prone to burning easily
    • Multiple blistering sunburns as a child
    • Family history of melanoma
    • Frequent exposure to sun or ultraviolet radiation
    • Certain genetic mutations
    • Exposure to environmental factors, such as radiation or vinyl chloride

    Other factors have been connected with increased metastasis. In a 2018 study in the Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia and a 2019 study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the following factors were associated with higher levels of metastasis:

    • Male gender
    • Primary tumor thickness of more than 4 mm
    • Nodular melanoma, which is a specific subtype that a care team would identify
    • Ulceration of the primary tumor

    What Increases Your Risk

    Pin on Skin Cancer

    A risk factor for melanoma is something that increases your chance of getting this cancer. Having one or more of these risk factors can make it more likely that you will get melanoma. But it doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it. And many people who get melanoma don’t have any of these risk factors.

    Risk factors for melanoma include:footnote 1

    • Too much exposure to the sun’s UV rays. This includes:
    • Having had blistering sunburns at any time of life.
    • Getting intense sun exposure every now and then.
  • Fair skin that doesn’t tan and tends to sunburn or freckle, along with blue or green eyes or red or blond hair.
  • Numerous moles and/or more than one atypical mole.
  • A large mole you have had since birth.
  • A personal or family history of melanoma.
  • Changes in your genes, like the change that causes a skin disease called Xeroderma pigmentosum.
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    Permission To Use This Summary

    PDQ is a registered trademark. The content of PDQ documents can be used freely as text. It cannot be identified as an NCI PDQ cancer information summary unless the whole summary is shown and it is updated regularly. However, a user would be allowed to write a sentence such as NCIs PDQ cancer information summary about breast cancer prevention states the risks in the following way: .

    The best way to cite this PDQ summary is:

    PDQ® Adult Treatment Editorial Board. PDQ Melanoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Updated < MM/DD/YYYY> . Available at: . Accessed < MM/DD/YYYY> .

    Images in this summary are used with permission of the author, artist, and/or publisher for use in the PDQ summaries only. If you want to use an image from a PDQ summary and you are not using the whole summary, you must get permission from the owner. It cannot be given by the National Cancer Institute. Information about using the images in this summary, along with many other images related to cancer can be found in Visuals Online. Visuals Online is a collection of more than 3,000 scientific images.

    How Dangerous Is Melanoma

    Melanoma is usually curable when detected and treated early. Once melanoma has spread deeper into the skin or other parts of the body, it becomes more difficult to treat and can be deadly.

    • The estimated five-year survival rate for U.S. patients whose melanoma is detected early is about 99 percent.
    • An estimated 7,180 people will die of melanoma in the U.S. in 2021.

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    Deterrence And Patient Education

    Patients need to receive counsel to engage in preventative activities, especially once they have been treated for melanoma. These actions include:

    • Avoid midday sun
    • Use sunscreen at all times of the year
    • Don protective clothing to cover skin
    • Avoid tanning beds
    • Be familiar with their skin so they can promptly spot changes – this includes areas that may not receive much sun exposure

    When Should I Call My Doctor

    Skin cancer types treatment: melanoma basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

    You should have a skin examination by a doctor if you have any of the following:

    • A personal history of skin cancer or atypical moles .
    • A family history of skin cancer.
    • A history of intense sun exposure as a young person and painful or blistering sunburns.
    • New or numerous large moles.
    • A mole that changes in size, color or shape.
    • Any mole that itches, bleeds or is tender.

    A note from Cleveland Clinic

    Receiving a diagnosis of melanoma can be scary. Watch your skin and moles for any changes and seeing your doctor regularly for skin examinations, especially if youre fair-skinned, will give you the best chances for catching melanoma early when its most treatable.

    Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 06/21/2021.

    References

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    Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Skin Cancer On The Rise

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare type of skin cancer that affects about 2,000 people in the United States each year.

    Though its an uncommon skin cancer, cases of Merkel cell carcinoma have increased rapidly in the last couple of decades.

    This type of cancer starts when cells in the skin, called Merkel cells, start to grow out of control.

    Merkel cell carcinomas typically grow quickly and can be difficult to treat if they spread.

    They can start anywhere on the body, but Merkel cell carcinomas commonly affect areas exposed to the sun, such as the face, neck, and arms.

    They may look like pink, red, or purple lumps that are firm when you touch them. Sometimes, they can open up as ulcers or sores.

    Risk factors include:

    When Should You Call Your Doctor

    The most important warning sign for melanoma is a change in size, shape, or colour of a mole or other skin growth . Call your doctor if you have:

    • Any change in a mole, including size, shape, colour, soreness, or pain.
    • A bleeding mole.
    • A discoloured area under a fingernail or toenail not caused by an injury.
    • A general darkening of the skin unrelated to sun exposure.

    if you have been diagnosed with melanoma and:

    • You have trouble breathing or swallowing.
    • You cough up or spit up blood.
    • You have blood in your vomit or bowel movement.
    • Your urine or bowel movement is black, and the blackness isn’t caused by taking iron or Pepto-Bismol.

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    Skin Exam And Physical

    If youve been diagnosed with melanoma, youve already had a skin biopsy. This biopsy was taken when you had part of the suspicious spot removed. After it was removed, a doctor looked at the spot under a microscope to find out if it contained cancer cells. This is currently the only way to tell if someone has skin cancer.

    After getting the diagnosis, the next step is to get a complete skin exam and physical.

    During the physical, your dermatologist will feel your lymph nodes. This is where melanoma usually goes when it begins to spread. It usually travels to the lymph nodes closest to the melanoma.

    If there is a risk the cancer could have spread, your dermatologist may recommend that you have a lymph node biopsy. If a sentinel lymph node biopsy is recommended, it can be performed at the time of your surgery for melanoma.

    After the skin exam and physical, your dermatologist may recommend testing, such as a CAT scan, MRI, or a blood test. These can also help detect spread.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Skin Cancer Of The Head And Neck

    Why And How Skin Cancer Screening Can Save Your Life

    Skin cancers usually present as an abnormal growth on the skin. The growth may have the appearance of a wart, crusty spot, ulcer, mole or sore. It may or may not bleed and can be painful. If you have a preexisting mole, any change in the characteristics of this spot – such as a raised or an irregular border, irregular shape, change in color, increase in size, itching or bleeding – are warning signs of melanoma. Sometimes the first sign of melanoma or squamous cell cancer is an enlarged lymph node.

    Johns Hopkins Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Specialists

    Our head and neck surgeons and speech language pathologists take a proactive approach to cancer treatment. Meet the Johns Hopkins specialists who will work closely with you during your journey.

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    What Are The Four Main Types Of Melanoma Of The Skin

    Superficial spreading melanoma

    What you should know: This is the most common form of melanoma.

    How and where it grows: It can arise in an existing mole or appear as a new lesion. When it begins in a mole that is already on the skin, it tends to grow on the surface of the skin for some time before penetrating more deeply. While it can be found nearly anywhere on the body, it is most likely to appear on the torso in men, the legs in women and the upper back in both.

    What it looks like: It may appear as a flat or slightly raised and discolored, asymmetrical patch with uneven borders. Colors include shades of tan, brown, black, red/pink, blue or white. It can also lack pigment and appear as a pink or skin-tone lesion .

    Lentigo maligna

    What you should know: This form of melanoma often develops in older people. When this cancer becomes invasive or spreads beyond the original site, the disease is known as lentigo maligna melanoma.

    How and where it grows: This form of melanoma is similar to the superficial spreading type, growing close to the skin surface at first. The tumor typically arises on sun-damaged skin on the face, ears, arms or upper torso.

    What it looks like: It may look like a flat or slightly raised, blotchy patch with uneven borders. Color is usually blue-black, but can vary from tan to brown or dark brown.

    Acral lentiginous melanoma

    What you should know: This is the most common form of melanoma found in people of color, including individuals of African ancestry.

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