Sunday, May 15, 2022
HomeCarcinomaWhat Is Superficial Squamous Cell Carcinoma

What Is Superficial Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Treating Precancerous Skin Conditions

Superficial Removal of a Squamous Cell Cancer on the Temple

In some cases, squamous cell carcinoma may emerge from a precancerous condition called actinic or solar keratosis. Beginning as pink, flat, rough lesions on the skin, actinic keratosis areas may rise above the skin and become hard. Skin cancer screenings are vital for detecting actinic keratosis and other precancerous skin lesions. When caught early, they are usually easy to treat with photodynamic therapy or topical chemotherapy.

What Are The Signs Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinomas are more typical on sun-exposed skin: the scalp, the backs of the hands, the ears, and the lips. But this form of skin cancer can spread anywhere on your body.

Squamous cell carcinomas will have these characteristics:
  • A firm, red nodule
  • A flat sore with a scaly crust
  • A new sore or raised area on an old scar
  • A rough, scaly patch on your lip that can become an open sore
  • A red sore or rough patch inside your mouth
  • A red, raised patch or wart-like sore on or in the anus or on the genitals

Treatment Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  • Usually locally destructive techniques

Treatment of squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that for basal cell carcinoma Treatment Basal cell carcinoma is a superficial, slowly growing papule or nodule that derives from certain epidermal cells. Basal cell carcinomas arise from keratinocytes near the basal layer, which are… read more and includes curettage and electrodesiccation, surgical excision, cryosurgery, topical chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy, or, occasionally, radiation therapy. Treatment and follow-up must be monitored closely because of the greater risk of metastasis compared with a basal cell carcinoma.

Squamous cell carcinoma on the lip or other mucocutaneous junction should be excised at times, cure is difficult.

Recurrences and large tumors should be treated aggressively with Mohs microscopically controlled surgery, in which tissue borders are progressively excised until specimens are tumor-free , or by a team approach with surgery and radiation therapy. Because tumors with perineural invasion are aggressive, radiation therapy should be considered after surgery.

Metastatic disease is responsive to radiation therapy if metastases can be identified and are isolated. Widespread metastases do not respond well to chemotherapeutic regimens. For inoperable advanced disease or metastatic disease, programmed death receptor 1 inhibitors are now an option.

You May Like: What Is The Survival Rate Of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

What Is The Treatment For Advanced Or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Locally advanced primary, recurrent or metastatic SCC requires multidisciplinary consultation. Often a combination of treatments is used.

Many thousands of New Zealanders are treated for cutaneous SCC each year, and more than 100 die from their disease.

How Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated

Treatment of Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous ...

It is usually possible to completely remove an SCC. The best type oftreatment for you will depend on the size of the SCC and where it is.

Usually, the doctor will remove an SCC using simple skin surgery. Theywill then look at the area under a microscope to check all the cancer has beenremoved. If it has spread, you might need radiotherapy afterwards.

Other ways of removing the SCC are:

  • scraping it off then sealing the base of the wound with an electric needle or liquid nitrogen
  • using a laser to burn the SCC away
  • freezing it off
  • Applying creams, liquids or lotions directly onto the SCC. Sometimes the doctor will shine a light on the area to make the medicine work

After treatment, you will need follow-up appointments with your doctor. You will be at greater risk of developing another skin cancer, so its more important than ever to protect your skin from the sun.

Recommended Reading: What Is The Prognosis For Basal Cell Carcinoma

How Is Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma Of Skin Treated

In general, the treatment of Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma of Skin depends upon a variety of factors including:

  • The location of the tumor
  • The number of tumors
  • The size of the tumor
  • Any health considerations of the patient

A number of treatment methods may be used to treat Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma of Skin. The treatment types may include:

Topical medications can be used to treat Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma. This is because the thinness of the tumor permits permeation of the active ingredient to the full depth of the carcinoma. The two most frequently used active ingredients are imiquimod and 5-Flurouracil.

  • Imiquimod is an immune system signal which calls for the migration of T-cells into the area of the tumor, which actively kill the cancer cells
  • 5-Flurouracil is a metabolic agent which toxically kills the more basal cell carcinoma cells. The surrounding normal skin does not absorb the medication and hence is safe from the toxicity

Both these topical applications take at least a few weeks to treat a typically sized lesion, longer for larger lesions. The actions will lead to redness, irritation, sometimes crusting and possibly secondary infection

One advantage of these creams is that it is sometimes possible to treat the Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma without affecting the underlying skin at all, so after healing, little to no scarring is detectable.

Other techniques to treat this skin cancer may include:

Exposure To Uv Radiation

The most common reason for the development of squamous cell carcinoma is ultraviolet radiation. Both types of UV radiation promote SCC. The sun, tanning beds, and sun lamps emit UVA, which is responsible for the tanning the color of the skin. UVB causes sunburns and is mostly responsible for SCC and melanoma. Fair-skinned individuals with a history of severe sunburns, sun poisoning, and blisters are at a high risk for SCC.

Don’t Miss: In Situ Cancer Melanoma

What Causes Squamous Cell Carcinomas

Squamous cell carcinomas of the skin develop when the flat, thin squamous cells in the outer layer of the skin develop errors in their DNA. In ordinary, healthy skin, new cells push older cells toward the skin surface, where they die and are shed. When the DNA is damaged, the squamous cells instead grow out of control, forming a squamous cell carcinoma.

When To Seek Help

Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers: Treatment including Mohs Surgery Video – Brigham and Womens

Not all sores on the skin are skin cancer. But if you do develop a skincancer, the earlier it is treated, the better the outcome for you.

Most people find SCCs by checking their own skin. Check your skin regularly so you notice any changes. See a doctor if:

  • you have a sore that doesn’t heal in 2 months
  • you notice a new and unusual looking spot
  • an existing spot changes in colour, size or shape
  • you have a spot that is asymmetrical
  • you have a spot with an uneven border
  • you have a spot with an unusual or uneven colour
  • you have a spot that is larger than 7 mm

Read Also: How Fast Does Cancer Spread Without Treatment

Basal Cell Carcinoma Stages

There are certain features that are considered to make the cancer at higher risk for spreading or recurrence, and these may also be used to stage basal cell carcinomas. These include:

  • Greater than 2 mm in thickness
  • Invasion into the lower dermis or subcutis layers of the skin
  • Invasion into the tiny nerves in the skin
  • Location on the ear or on a hair-bearing lip

After the TNM components and risk factors have been established, the cancer is given a stage. For basal cell carcinoma staging, the factors are grouped and labeled 0 to 4. The characteristics and stages of basal cell carcinoma are:

Stage 0: Also called carcinoma in situ, cancer discovered in this stage is only present in the epidermis and has not spread deeper to the dermis.

Stage 1 basal cell carcinoma: The cancer is less than 2 centimeters, about 4/5 of an inch across, has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or organs, and has one or fewer high-risk features.

Stage 2 basal cell carcinoma: The cancer is larger than 2 centimeters across, and has not spread to nearby organs or lymph nodes, or a tumor of any size with 2 or more high-risk features.

Stage 3 basal cell carcinoma: The cancer has spread into facial bones or 1 nearby lymph node, but not to other organs.

Stage 4 basal cell carcinoma: The cancer can be any size and has spread to 1 or more lymph nodes which are larger than 3 cm and may have spread to bones or other organs in the body.

What Are The Stages Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

There are five stages of this form of skin cancer:

Most squamous cell carcinomas show up as Stage 0 or Stage 1.

  • Stage 0 Also known as carcinoma in situ, this stage is not considered to be invasive. The abnormal cells are only in the upper layer of the epidermis, the outer skin.
  • Stage 1 and Stage 2 Designation in these stages depends on how big the cancer is and if there are any high-risk features in the tumor.
  • Stage 3 This stage has spread to areas below the skin, such as into the lymph nodes or other local structures like muscle, bone, or cartilage.
  • Stage 4 The cancer has spread to distant sites in this stage.

Don’t Miss: Cancer On Arm Pictures

How To Tell If Squamous Cell Carcinoma Has Spread

While its not common for squamous cell carcinoma to spread, it is helpful to be mindful of the signs. First, there are certain known risk factors to be aware of, as these characteristics have been associated with a higher stage of squamous cell carcinoma. Risk factors for squamous cell spreading include:

  • The tumor is thicker than 2 millimeters.
  • The tumor has grown into the lower dermis or subcutis layers of the skin.
  • The tumor has grown into the nerves in the skin.
  • The tumor is present on the ear or on a hair-bearing lip.

Knowing the stage of your cancer will help your medical team understand how serious it is and how best to treat it. Staging squamous cell carcinoma is based on a physical exam, detailed history, skin biopsy, lymph node biopsy, and imaging studies.

To determine if your cancer has spread, your physician may recommend several diagnostic tests. A skin or lymph node biopsy can show how far cancer cells have spread in the region of the primary tumor. Your medical team may also recommend a computed tomography scan to determine the spread.

You may also be able to recognize squamous cell carcinoma spreading by its appearance. Possible symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma include:

  • A thick, red, scaly patch of skin
  • An open sore or scar
  • An elevated growth that is usually pink, red, or the color of your flesh.
  • A wartlike nodule with raised edges

While most squamous cell carcinoma lesions are painless, it is possible to experience pain or numbness at the site.

What Is The Outlook For Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

[PDF] Treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma and ...

Most SCCs are cured by treatment. A cure is most likely if treatment is undertaken when the lesion is small. The risk of recurrence or disease-associated death is greater for tumours that are > 20 mm in diameter and/or > 2 mm in thickness at the time of surgical excision.

About 50% of people at high risk of SCC develop a second one within 5 years of the first. They are also at increased risk of other skin cancers, especially melanoma. Regular self-skin examinations and long-term annual skin checks by an experienced health professional are recommended.

Don’t Miss: What Is The Survival Rate For Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

How Do Dermatologists Diagnose Squamous Cell Carcinoma Of The Skin

Because this cancer begins on the skin, its possible to find it early when its highly treatable.

When you see a board-certified dermatologist, your dermatologist will examine your skin carefully.

If your dermatologist finds a spot on your skin that could be any type of skin cancer, your dermatologist will first numb the area and then remove all of it. This can be done during an office visit and is called a skin biopsy. This is a simple procedure, which a dermatologist can quickly, safely, and easily perform.

Having a skin biopsy is the only way to know for sure whether you have skin cancer.

What your dermatologist removes will be examined under a high-powered microscope. Your dermatologist or a doctor who has in-depth experience diagnosing skin growths, such as a dermatopathologist, is best qualified to examine the removed tissue under a microscope.

After examining the removed tissue, the doctor writes a biopsy report. Also called a pathology report, this report explains what was seen under the microscope, including whether any skin cancer cells were seen.

If you have squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, the report will contain the following information when possible:

  • Type of SCC

  • Whether the cancer has any features that make it aggressive

Scc Is Mainly Caused By Cumulative Uv Exposure Over The Course Of A Lifetime

If youve had a basal cell carcinoma you may be more likely to develop a squamous cell skin carcinoma, as is anyone with an inherited, highly UV-sensitive condition such as xeroderma pigmentosum.

Chronic infections, skin inflammation, HIV and other immune deficiency diseases, chemotherapy, anti-rejection drugs used in organ transplantation, and excessive sun exposure can all lead to a risk of squamous cell carcinoma.

Occasionally, squamous cell carcinomas arise spontaneously on what appears to be normal, healthy skin. Some researchers believe the tendency to develop these cancers can be inherited.

SCCs may occur on all areas of the body including the mucous membranes and genitals, but are most common in areas frequently exposed to the sun:

  • Ears
  • Previous BCC or SCC
  • Chronic inflammatory skin conditions or chronic infections

But anyone with a history of substantial sun exposure is at increased risk. Those whose occupations require long hours outside or who spend their leisure time in the sun are also at risk.

Recommended Reading: What Is The Prognosis For Skin Cancer

Treatments For Very Small Skin Cancers

If your skin cancer is very small and has a low risk of spreading, you might consider less invasive treatments, including:

  • Curettage and electrodessication .C and E treatment involves removing the surface of the skin cancer with a scraping instrument and then searing the base of the cancer with an electric needle. This treatment is often used for small or very superficial squamous cell cancers of the skin.
  • Laser therapy. An intense beam of light vaporizes growths, usually with little damage to surrounding tissue and with a reduced risk of bleeding, swelling and scarring. Laser treatment may be an option for very superficial skin lesions.
  • Freezing. This treatment involves freezing cancer cells with liquid nitrogen . It may be an option for treating superficial skin lesions. Freezing might be done after using a scraping instrument to remove the surface of the skin cancer.
  • Photodynamic therapy combines photosensitizing drugs and light to treat superficial skin cancers. During photodynamic therapy, a liquid drug that makes the cancer cells sensitive to light is applied to the skin. Later, a light that destroys the skin cancer cells is shined on the area.

What Are The Causes Of Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma Of Skin

Overview of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma
  • The exact cause of development of Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma of Skin is not completely known, in a majority of cases
  • Although, genetic mutations have been detected in Basal Cell Carcinomas, which are currently being characterized
  • Most BCCs are sporadic in origin i.e., they occur in a random fashion

Read Also: Ductal Carcinoma Breast Cancer Survival Rates

Treatments For Skin Cancer That Spreads Beyond The Skin

When squamous cell carcinoma spreads to other parts of the body, drug treatments might be recommended, including:

  • Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses powerful drugs to kill cancer cells. If squamous cell carcinoma spreads to the lymph nodes or other parts of the body, chemotherapy can be used alone or in combination with other treatments, such as targeted drug therapy and radiation therapy.
  • Targeted drug therapy. Targeted drug treatments focus on specific weaknesses present within cancer cells. By blocking these weaknesses, targeted drug treatments can cause cancer cells to die. Targeted drug therapy is usually combined with chemotherapy.
  • Immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is a drug treatment that helps your immune system to fight cancer. Your body’s disease-fighting immune system might not attack cancer because the cancer cells produce proteins that blind the immune system cells. Immunotherapy works by interfering with that process. For squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, immunotherapy might be considered when the cancer is advanced and other treatments aren’t an option.

What Are The 5 Stages Of Skin Cancer

Staging is an important tool used to treat skin cancer. Your stage helps the medical team determine where the tumor is, how large it is, where it has spread, your prognosis, and the most effective treatment plan.

The five stages of squamous cell carcinoma include:

  • Stage 0: Also known as carcinoma in situ, in this stage cancer is present in the epidermis. It has not spread to deeper layers.
  • Stage 1: The tumor is smaller than 2 centimeters and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or other organs. The individual has one or fewer risk factors for spread.
  • Stage 2: The tumor is wider than 2 centimeters and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or other organs. This stage also applies to any sized tumor when the individual has two or more risk factors.
  • Stage 3: The tumor has spread into nearby facial bones or one lymph node. It has not spread to other organs.
  • Stage 4: The tumor is of any size and has metastasized to one or more of the lymph nodes. It may have spread to the bones and other distant organs.

You May Like: Stage 3 Melanoma Survival Rate

RELATED ARTICLES

Popular Articles