HomeMelanomaIs Stage 0 Melanoma Considered Cancer

Is Stage 0 Melanoma Considered Cancer

Precancer Or Noninvasive Cancer

Beyond The Shock – Chapter 5 – Types & Stages – Stage 0 & 1

Some physicians use the terms;precancer;and noninvasive cancer interchangeably when referring to stage 0 breast cancer, whereas others simply call it cancer. There is great debate over this, but generally, DCIS is considered cancer, while LCIS isn’t .

Aside from clinical perspectives that shape their opinion on the proper terminology to use, some physicians consider how hearing “cancer” will affect a patient.

Learning that your condition is “precancerous” may make you worry that it will inevitably progress to cancer and that it must be treated as such . On the other hand, people told that they have a “noninvasive cancer” often lump their condition in with more advanced cases of the disease. In fact, some doctors refer to LCIS as lobular neoplasia simply because it sounds less frightening.

Don’t be mistaken: Both DCIS and LCIS are concerning because they have the potential to invade beyond their well-contained sites. Both carcinomas have the cellular appearance of cancer and both might eventually grow and spread beyond their original clumps. But, they also might not. So far, doctors can’t say which direction any particular case will go.

While stage 0 breast cancer should be taken seriously, the lower the stage number, the easier the disease is to treat.

Remember that all of these names for stage 0 breast cancer are just different ways to refer to the same thing. Don’t get hung up on terms when deciding on treatment.

How Common Is Melanoma

Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of all skin cancers, but causes the great majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Its one of the most common cancers in young people under 30, especially in young women.

Melanoma incidence has dramatically increased over the past 30 years. Its widely accepted that increasing levels of ultraviolet exposure are one of the main reasons for this rapid rise in the number of melanoma cases.

What Is Squamous Cell Cancer

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is a common skin cancer that typically develops in chronic sun-exposed areas of your body. This type of skin cancer is usually not nearly as aggressive as melanoma and is uncontrolled growth of cells in the epidermis of your skin.

It can become disfiguring and sometimes deadly if allowed to grow. Squamous cell carcinomas are at least twice as frequent in men as in women. They rarely appear before age 50 and are most often seen in individuals in their 70s.

An estimated 700,000 cases of SCC are diagnosed each year in the United States, resulting in approximately 2,500 deaths.

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What They Look Like

Melanomas in situ tend to be flat and asymmetric with irregular borders. They can be black, brown, tan, gray or even pink if the person has very fair skin. Areas that receive the greatest sun exposure, such as the scalp, face and neck, are more likely to develop melanoma in situ than the arms or legs. However, non-sun exposed areas, such as the buttocks, are also at risk. We dont always understand the causes of these melanomas, though heredity can play a role. To detect melanoma in situ as early as possible, it helps to monitor your own skin. Head-to-toe self-examinations are a good place to start, including the areas where the sun doesnt shine. When evaluating your skin, focus on the ABCDEs of melanoma detection.;A;stands for;asymmetry;;B;for irregular;borders;;C;for more than one;color;;D;for;diameter;greater than 6mm , or the size of a pencil eraser; and;E;for;evolving, meaning any lesion that is new or changing.;View helpful photos showing the ABCDEs of melanoma.

There Are Different Types Of Cancer That Start In The Skin

There are two main forms of skin cancer: melanoma and nonmelanoma.

Melanoma is a rare form of skin cancer. It is more likely to invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body than other types of skin cancer. When melanoma starts in the skin, it is called cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma may also occur in mucous membranes . This PDQ summary is about cutaneous melanoma and melanoma that affects the mucous membranes.

The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. They are nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancers rarely spread to other parts of the body.

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What Skin Cancer Looks Like When It Starts

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

This nonmelanoma skin cancer may appear as a firm red nodule, a scaly growth that bleeds or develops a crust, or a sore that doesnt heal. It most often occurs on the nose, forehead, ears, lower lip, hands, and other sun-exposed areas of the body.

Treatments For Stage Ii Melanoma

As with stage I, stage II melanoma is typically treated with wide excision;surgery, which cuts out the melanoma along with a margin of healthy surrounding skin. In the case of stage II melanoma, many doctors will recommend looking for;cancer in nearby lymph nodes by performing a sentinel lymph node biopsy, which may necessitate further treatment if cancer cells are found.

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Is Stage 1 Melanoma Considered Cancer

In Stage I melanoma, the cancer cells are in both the first and second layers of the skinthe epidermis and the dermis. A melanoma tumor is considered Stage I if it is up to 2 mm thick, and it may or may not have ulceration. There is no evidence the cancer has spread to lymph nodes or distant sites .

Are There Other Ways Cancer Is Staged

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ-Is Treatment Necessary?

Cancers that dont appear as solid tumors are generally cancers of the blood, and for those, there are other staging systems.

For instance, the Ann Arbor staging classification, a four-stage system, helps doctors figure out prognosis and best treatment options by examining the location, number of involved sites, and any systemic symptoms in Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoid malignancies.

This staging can’t be used for other cancers of the blood/bone marrow, however, including most types of leukemia, which don’t have a clear staging system. Likewise, as we mentioned earlier, central nervous system tumorsso, brain tumorsdont currently have a single staging system.

Whats most important to remember is that the stage of your cancer is one tool, of many, in your oncologist’s care tool kit. It helps them better predict what your response to treatment might bebiomarkers can help make that prediction, as can past research showing how patients in your particular stage did on certain treatment regimes.

By giving doctors parameters to compare your situation to other patients in the same stage, you can get a lot of information, from how effective one treatment option is versus anotherto what side effects you might experience, and what meds might help you handle them. All of this adds up to creating the most targeted, effective treatment plan for you.

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Skin Exam And Physical

If youve been diagnosed with melanoma, youve already had a skin biopsy. This biopsy was taken when you had part of the suspicious spot removed. After it was removed, a doctor looked at the spot under a microscope to find out if it contained cancer cells. This is currently the only way to tell if someone has skin cancer.

After getting the diagnosis, the next step is to get a complete skin exam and physical.

During the physical, your dermatologist will feel your lymph nodes. This is where melanoma usually goes when it begins to spread. It usually travels to the lymph nodes closest to the melanoma.

If there is a risk the cancer could have spread, your dermatologist may recommend that you have a lymph node biopsy. If a sentinel lymph node biopsy is recommended, it can be performed at the time of your surgery for melanoma.

After the skin exam and physical, your dermatologist may recommend testing, such as a CAT scan, MRI, or a blood test. These can also help detect spread.

Treatment Of Stage I Melanoma

For information about the treatments listed below, see the Treatment Option Overview section.

Treatment of stage I melanoma may include the following:

Use our clinical trial search to find NCI-supported cancer clinical trials that are accepting patients. You can search for trials based on the type of cancer, the age of the patient, and where the trials are being done. General information about clinical trials is also available.

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Stages Of Melanoma Skin Cancer

Staging describes or classifies a cancer based on how much cancer there is in the body and where it is when first diagnosed. This is often called the extent of cancer. Information from tests is used to find out the size of the tumour, which parts of the skin have cancer, whether the cancer has spread from where it first started and where the cancer has spread. Your healthcare team uses the stage to plan treatment and estimate the outcome .

The most common staging system for melanoma skin cancer is the TNM system. For melanoma skin cancer there are 5 stages stage 0 followed by stages 1 to 4. Often the stages 1 to 4 are written as the Roman numerals I, II, III and IV. Generally, the higher the stage number, the more the cancer has spread. Talk to your doctor if you have questions about staging.

When describing the stage, doctors often use the words early stage, locoregional or metastatic.

Early stage means that the cancer is only in where it started and has not spread to other parts of the body. It includes stage 0, stage 1A, stage 1B, stage 2A, stage 2B and stage 2C melanoma skin cancers.

Locoregional means the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes, or it has spread to nearby areas of skin or lymph vessels. It includes stage 3 melanoma skin cancer.

Metastatic means that the cancer is in a part of the body farther from where it started. It includes stage 4 melanoma skin cancer.

Find out more about .

What Is Melanomain Situ

Melanoma in situ is an early form of primary;melanoma;in which the malignant cells are confined to the tissue of origin, the epidermis. It is also known as in-situ melanoma and level 1 melanoma.

As melanoma in situ has no associated mortality, early detection of melanoma in an in-situ phase increases survival from melanoma and leads to less morbidity and decreased costs compared to that associated with more advanced melanoma .;

Management of melanoma is evolving. For up to date recommendations, refer to Australian Cancer Council;Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of melanoma.

Melanoma in situ

See more;images of melanoma in situ.

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treatment

Squamous cell carcinomas detected at an early stage and removed promptly are almost always curable and cause minimal damage. However, left untreated, they may grow to the point of being very difficult to treat.

A small percentage may even metastasize to distant tissues and organs. Your doctor can help you determine if a particular SCC is at increased risk for metastasis and may need treatment beyond simple excision.

Fortunately, there are several effective ways to treat squamous cell carcinoma. The choice of treatment is based on the type, size, location, and depth of penetration of the tumor, as well as the patients age and general health. Squamous cell carcinoma treatment can almost always be performed on an outpatient basis.

Recurrence In Other Parts Of The Body

Melanoma can also come back in distant parts of the body. Almost any organ can be affected. Most often, the melanoma will come back in the lungs, bones, liver, or brain. Treatment for these recurrences is generally the same as for stage IV melanoma . Melanomas that recur on an arm or leg may be treated with isolated limb perfusion/infusion chemotherapy.

Melanoma that comes back in the brain can be hard to treat. Single tumors can sometimes be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy to the brain may help as well. Systemic treatments might also be tried.

As with other stages of melanoma, people with recurrent melanoma may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial.

The treatment information given here is not official policy of the American Cancer Society and is not intended as medical advice to replace the expertise and judgment of your cancer care team. It is intended to help you and your family make informed decisions, together with your doctor. Your doctor may have reasons for suggesting a treatment plan different from these general treatment options. Don’t hesitate to ask him or her questions about your treatment options.

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Treating Stage Iii Melanoma

These cancers have already reached the lymph nodes when the melanoma is first diagnosed. Surgical treatment for stage III melanoma usually requires wide excision of the primary tumor as in earlier stages, along with lymph node dissection.

After surgery, adjuvant treatment with an immune checkpoint inhibitor or with targeted therapy drugs may help lower the risk of the melanoma coming back. Other drugs or perhaps vaccines may also be recommended as part of a clinical trial to try to reduce the chance the melanoma will come back. Another option is to give radiation therapy to the areas where the lymph nodes were removed, especially if many of the nodes contain cancer.

If melanoma tumors are found in nearby lymph vessels in or just under the skin , they should all be removed, if possible. Other options include injections of the T-VEC vaccine , Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccine, or interleukin-2 directly into the melanoma; radiation therapy; or applying imiquimod cream. For melanomas on an arm or leg, another option might be isolated limb perfusion or isolated limb infusion . Other possible treatments might include targeted therapy , immunotherapy, or chemotherapy.

Some people with stage III melanoma might not be cured with current treatments, so they may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial of newer treatments.

Melanoma In Situ Treatment Options

Lobular Carcinoma In Situ, What Is It?

Fortunately, stage 0 melanomas are, most often, easy to treat because they are the least invasive when compared to the other stages of melanoma. Typically, all that is required is excision of the affected cells and surrounding healthy tissue; this type of outpatient treatment is often found to be successful. Of note, however, repeated surgical treatment may be required until all margins of the area in concern are clear.

Excision may not be ideal in the cases of malignant melanoma in situ of the head and neck due to the risk of disfiguration. Researchers at the University of Connecticut Health Center and School of Medicine have reported that the use of the 5% strength topical cream, imiquimod, healed patients suffering from facial melanoma in situ. Thus, imiquimod was found to be an effective treatment without the normal disfiguring results of excision.

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Patients May Want To Think About Taking Part In A Clinical Trial

For some patients, taking part in a clinical trial may be the best treatment choice. Clinical trials are part of the cancer research process. Clinical trials are done to find out if new cancer treatments are safe and effective or better than the standard treatment.

Many of today’s standard treatments for cancer are based on earlier clinical trials. Patients who take part in a clinical trial may receive the standard treatment or be among the first to receive a new treatment.

Patients who take part in clinical trials also help improve the way cancer will be treated in the future. Even when clinical trials do not lead to effective new treatments, they often answer important questions and help move research forward.

What Does Stage 1 Melanoma Look Like

Stage 1: The cancer is up to 2 millimeters thick. It has not yet spread to lymph nodes or other sites, and it may or may not be ulcerated. Stage 2: The cancer is at least 1 mm thick but may be thicker than 4 mm. It may or may not be ulcerated, and it has not yet spread to lymph nodes or other sites.

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What Are The Signs Of Melanoma

Knowing how to spot melanoma is important because early melanomas are highly treatable. Melanoma can appear as moles, scaly patches, open sores or raised bumps.

Use the American Academy of Dermatology’s “ABCDE” memory device to learn the warning signs that a spot on your skin may be melanoma:

  • Asymmetry: One half does not match the other half.
  • Border: The edges are not smooth.
  • Color: The color is mottled and uneven, with shades of brown, black, gray, red or white.
  • Diameter: The spot is greater than the tip of a pencil eraser .
  • Evolving: The spot is new or changing in size, shape or color.

Some melanomas don’t fit the ABCDE rule, so tell your doctor about any sores that won’t go away, unusual bumps or rashes or changes in your skin or in any existing moles.

Another tool to recognize melanoma is the ugly duckling sign. If one of your moles looks different from the others, its the ugly duckling and should be seen by a dermatologist.

Unusual Moles Exposure To Sunlight And Health History Can Affect The Risk Of Melanoma

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk.

Risk factors for melanoma include the following:

  • Having a fair complexion, which includes the following:
  • Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not tan, or tans poorly.
  • Blue or green or other light-colored eyes.
  • Red or blond hair.
  • Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight .
  • Being exposed to certain factors in the environment . Some of the environmental risk factors for melanoma are radiation, solvents, vinyl chloride, and PCBs.
  • Having a history of many blistering sunburns, especially as a child or teenager.
  • Having several large or many small moles.
  • Having a family history of unusual moles .
  • Having a family or personal history of melanoma.
  • Being White.
  • Having a weakened immune system.
  • Having certain changes in the genes that are linked to melanoma.
  • Being White or having a fair complexion increases the risk of melanoma, but anyone can have melanoma, including people with dark skin.

    See the following PDQ summaries for more information on risk factors for melanoma:

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