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How Serious Is Squamous Skin Cancer

What Is Squamous Cell Cancer

How Dangerous are Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is a common skin cancer that typically develops in chronic sun-exposed areas of your body. This type of skin cancer is usually not nearly as aggressive as melanoma and is uncontrolled growth of cells in the epidermis of your skin.

It can become disfiguring and sometimes deadly if allowed to grow. Squamous cell carcinomas are at least twice as frequent in men as in women. They rarely appear before age 50 and are most often seen in individuals in their 70s.

An estimated 700,000 cases of SCC are diagnosed each year in the United States, resulting in approximately 2,500 deaths.

How To Spot A Bcc: Five Warning Signs

Check for BCCs where your skin is most exposed to the sun, especially the face, ears, neck, scalp, chest, shoulders and back, but remember that they can occur anywhere on the body. Frequently, two or more of these warning signs are visible in a BCC tumor.

  • An open sore that does not heal, and may bleed, ooze or crust. The sore might persist for weeks, or appear to heal and then come back.
  • A reddish patch or irritated area, on the face, chest, shoulder, arm or leg that may crust, itch, hurt or cause no discomfort.
  • A shiny bump or nodule that is pearly or clear, pink, red or white. The bump can also be tan, black or brown, especially in dark-skinned people, and can be mistaken for a normal mole.
  • A small pink growth with a slightly raised, rolled edge and a crusted indentation in the center that may develop tiny surface blood vessels over time.
  • A scar-like area that is flat white, yellow or waxy in color. The skin appears shiny and taut, often with poorly defined borders. This warning sign may indicate an invasive BCC.
  • Please note: Since not all BCCs have the same appearance, these images serve as a general reference to what basal cell carcinoma looks like.

    An open sore that does not heal

    A reddish patch or irritated area

    A small pink growth with a slightly raised, rolled edge and a crusted indentation in the center

    A shiny bump or nodule

    A scar-like area that is flat white, yellow or waxy in color

    How Serious Is My Cancer

    If you have skin cancer, the doctor will want to find out how far it has spread. This is called staging.

    Basal and squamous cell skin cancers don’t spread as often as some other types of cancer, so the exact stage might not be too important. Still, your doctor might want to find out the stage of your cancer to help decide what type of treatment is best for you.

    The stage describes the growth or spread of the cancer through the skin. It also tells if the cancer has spread to other parts of your body that are close by or farther away.

    Your cancer can be stage 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4. The lower the number, the less the cancer has spread. A higher number, like stage 4, means a more serious cancer that has spread beyond the skin. Be sure to ask the doctor about the cancer stage and what it means for you.

    Other things can also help you and your doctor decide how to treat your cancer, such as:

    • Where the cancer is on your body
    • How fast the cancer has been growing
    • If the cancer is causing symptoms, such as being painful or itchy
    • If the cancer is in a place that was already treated with radiation
    • If you have a weakened immune system

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    How Can A Squamous Cell Carcinoma Be Treated

    Surgery is usually the recommended treatment. This involves removing the SCC with a margin of normal skin around it, using a local anaesthetic. The skin is then closed with stitches or sometimes a skin graft is needed. Sometimes other surgical methods are used such as curettage and cautery. This involves scraping the SCC away using local anaesthetic.

    Radiotherapy can also be used to treat SCC. This involves shining a beam of X-rays onto the skin. Usually several sessions are required.

    For advanced SCC, a combination of treatments may be used. For SCC that has spread to other parts of the body a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may be used.

    How Can You Prevent Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    What is skin cancer?

    Practicing sun safety is the best way to prevent SCC and other skin cancers. Here are some tips:

    • Avoid being in the sun from 10 am to 4 pm.
    • Avoid tanning beds.
    • Use a broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher each day. If you will be outside for longer periods of time, use a broad spectrum sunscreen that is water-resistant and has an SPF of 30 or higher. Put the sunscreen on 30 minutes before going outside. Put sunscreen on again every two hours, or more frequently if you have been swimming or sweating a lot.
    • Use protective clothing that has built-in sun protection, which is measured in UPF. Also, use broad-brimmed hats and sunglasses.
    • Do your own skin self-exam about once per month, and see a dermatologist about one time per year for a professional skin exam.
    • Have any skin changes examined as soon as possible by a healthcare provider.

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    Contact The Skin Cancer Expert

    Dr. Daniel C. Allison is a renowned orthopedic oncologist who has extensive expertise in diagnosing and treating various cancers including squamous cell and melanoma. He understands the complexities of cancer and is the ideal physician for providing you with a personalized treatment plan. Contact us today for a personal consultation at 310.683.4586 and learn how we can help you.

    What Is Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Invasive squamous cell carcinoma occurs when this form of skin cancer is left untreated, allowing it to develop deeper into the body and surrounding tissues. How serious is invasive squamous cell carcinoma? Any cancer that progresses to its later stages will be more difficult to beat, especially if it has spread.

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    Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treatment

    Squamous cell carcinoma can usually be treated with minor surgery that can be done in a doctors office or hospital clinic. Depending on the size and location of the SCC, your doctor may choose different techniques to remove it.

    For small skin cancers:

    • Curettage and electrodessication : removing the top layer of the skin cancer then using an electronic needle to kill cancer cells
    • Laser therapy: an intense light destroys the growth
    • : a photosensitizing solution applied to your skin then activated with a light or daylight, or sometimes with intense pulsed light
    • Cryosurgery: freezing of the spot using liquid nitrogen

    For larger skin cancers:

    • Excision: cutting out the cancer spot and some healthy skin around it, then stitching up the wound
    • Mohs surgery: excision and then inspecting the excised skin using a microscope this requires stitching up the wound

    How Is Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Of The Head And Neck Diagnosed

    How Dangerous is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    Diagnosis is made by clinical exam and a biopsy. Squamous cell cancers are staged by size and extent of growth. Squamous cell cancers can metastasize to nearby lymph nodes or other organs, and can invade both small and large nerves and local structures.

    Biopsy can help determine if the squamous cell cancer is a low-risk tumor or a high-risk tumor that requires more aggressive treatment. Low-risk tumors are less than 10 millimeters in size, less than or equal to 5 millimeters deep and do not involve structures beyond the surrounding fat. High-risk tumors in the head and neck are those that involve the central face, nose and eye area, as well as those tumors that are greater than or equal to 10 millimeters on the cheeks, scalp and neck, tumors that are more than 5 millimeters thick or involve adjacent structures, tumors that invade nerves, tumors that are recurrent or arising from previously radiated tissue, and tumors arising in patients who are immunosuppressed.

    Read Also: What Is Large Cell Carcinoma

    Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Skin Cancer On The Rise

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare type of skin cancer that affects about 2,000 people in the United States each year.

    Though its an uncommon skin cancer, cases of Merkel cell carcinoma have increased rapidly in the last couple of decades.

    This type of cancer starts when cells in the skin, called Merkel cells, start to grow out of control.

    Merkel cell carcinomas typically grow quickly and can be difficult to treat if they spread.

    They can start anywhere on the body, but Merkel cell carcinomas commonly affect areas exposed to the sun, such as the face, neck, and arms.

    They may look like pink, red, or purple lumps that are firm when you touch them. Sometimes, they can open up as ulcers or sores.

    Risk factors include:

    Get To Know Your Skin And Check It Regularly

    Look out for changes such as:

    • A mole that changes shape, color, size, bleeds, or develops an irregular border
    • A new spot on the skin that changes in size, shape, or color
    • Sores that dont heal
    • New bumps, lumps, or spots that dont go away
    • Shiny, waxy, or scar type lesions
    • New dark patches of skin that have appeared
    • Rough, red, scaly, skin patches

    If you notice any changes to your skin, seek advice from a medical professional. Basal cell carcinoma is very treatable when caught early.

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    What Is Skin Cancer

    Cancer can start any place in the body. Skin cancer starts when cells in the skin grow out of control.

    Skin cancer cells can sometimes spread to other parts of the body, but this is not common. When cancer cells do this, its called metastasis. To doctors, the cancer cells in the new place look just like the ones from the skin.

    Cancer is always named based on the place where it starts. So if skin cancer spreads to another part of the body, its still called skin cancer.

    The skin

    Ask your doctor to use this picture to show you where your cancer is

    What Are The Symptoms Of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Skin Cancer

    Squamous cell carcinomas are usually raised growths, ranging from the size of a pea to the size of a chestnut. They may appear as scaly red patches, open sores or protruding growths with a dented center, or they may look like a wart. Most are found in areas of the body that are frequently exposed to the sun, such as the ears, lips, face, balding scalp, neck, hands, arms, and legs. Less commonly, they may appear on mucous membranes and genitals. Regardless of what form the bumps take, they do not heal or go away on their own.

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    How Dangerous Is Scc

    While the majority of SCCs can be easily and successfully treated, if allowed to grow, these lesions can become disfiguring, dangerous and even deadly. Untreated SCCs can become invasive, grow into deeper layers of skin and spread to other parts of the body.

    Did you know?

    Americans die each year from squamous cell carcinoma

    Our Approach To Basal Cell And Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    UCSF provides superior, proven care to prevent, detect and manage basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, and will tailor cutting-edge treatment plans to the individual patient. Our dermatologists, medical and surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists and dermatopathologists are known for providing the best treatment options and cure rates for skin cancer, while giving outstanding cosmetic results.

    Some of our new diagnostic and treatment techniques include lymph node mapping to detect early occurrences of cancer, electron beam radiation and Mohs micrographic surgery, which removes the smallest amount of healthy tissue in order to minimize scarring and preserve skin function. We also offer our patients access to educational programs, resources for emotional support and opportunities to participate in experimental treatments.

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    What Does Skin Cancer Look Like

    Basal cell carcinoma

    • BCC frequently develops in people who have fair skin. People who have skin of color also get this skin cancer.

    • BCCs often look like a flesh-colored round growth, pearl-like bump, or a pinkish patch of skin.

    • BCCs usually develop after years of frequent sun exposure or indoor tanning.

    • BCCs are common on the head, neck, and arms however, they can form anywhere on the body, including the chest, abdomen, and legs.

    • Early diagnosis and treatment for BCC are important. BCC can grow deep. Allowed to grow, it can penetrate the nerves and bones, causing damage and disfigurement.

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

    • People who have light skin are most likely to develop SCC. This skin cancer also develops in people who have darker skin.

    • SCC often looks like a red firm bump, scaly patch, or a sore that heals and then re-opens.

    • SCC tends to form on skin that gets frequent sun exposure, such as the rim of the ear, face, neck, arms, chest, and back.

    • SCC can grow deep into the skin, causing damage and disfigurement.

    • Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent SCC from growing deep and spreading to other areas of the body.

    SCC can develop from a precancerous skin growth

    • People who get AKs usually have fair skin.

    • AKs usually form on the skin that gets lots of sun exposure, such as the head, neck, hands, and forearms.

    • Because an AK can turn into a type of skin cancer, treatment is important.

    Melanoma

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    Infiltrative Basal Cell Carcinoma

    How dangerous is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    This photo contains content that some people may find graphic or disturbing.

    DermNet NZ

    Infiltrative basal cell carcinoma occurs when a tumor makes its way into the dermis via thin strands between collagen fibers. This aggressive type of skin cancer is harder to diagnose and treat because of its location. Typically, infiltrative basal cell carcinoma appears as scar tissue or thickening of the skin and requires a biopsy to properly diagnose.

    To remove this type of basal cell carcinoma, a specific form of surgery, called Mohs, is used. During a Mohs surgery, also called Mohs micrographic surgery, thin layers of skin are removed until there is no cancer tissue left.

    This photo contains content that some people may find graphic or disturbing.

    DermNet NZ

    Superficial basal cell carcinoma, also known as in situ basal-cell carcinoma, tends to occur on the shoulders or the upper part of the torso, but it can also be found on the legs and arms. This type of cancer isnt generally invasive because it has a slow rate of growth and is fairly easy to spot and diagnose. It appears reddish or pinkish in color and may crust over or ooze. Superficial basal cell carcinoma accounts for roughly 15%-26% of all basal cell carcinoma cases.

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    How Do Dermatologists Diagnose Squamous Cell Carcinoma Of The Skin

    Because this cancer begins on the skin, its possible to find it early when its highly treatable.

    When you see a board-certified dermatologist, your dermatologist will examine your skin carefully.

    If your dermatologist finds a spot on your skin that could be any type of skin cancer, your dermatologist will first numb the area and then remove all of it. This can be done during an office visit and is called a skin biopsy. This is a simple procedure, which a dermatologist can quickly, safely, and easily perform.

    Having a skin biopsy is the only way to know for sure whether you have skin cancer.

    What your dermatologist removes will be examined under a high-powered microscope. Your dermatologist or a doctor who has in-depth experience diagnosing skin growths, such as a dermatopathologist, is best qualified to examine the removed tissue under a microscope.

    After examining the removed tissue, the doctor writes a biopsy report. Also called a pathology report, this report explains what was seen under the microscope, including whether any skin cancer cells were seen.

    If you have squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, the report will contain the following information when possible:

    • Type of SCC

    • Whether the cancer has any features that make it aggressive

    Surgery For Skin Cancer

    Small skin cancer lesions may be removed through a variety of techniques, including simple excision , electrodesiccation and curettage , and cryosurgery .

    Larger tumors, lesions in high-risk locations, recurrent tumors, and lesions in cosmetically sensitive areas are removed by a technique called Mohs micrographic surgery. For this technique, the surgeon carefully removes tissue, layer by layer, until cancer-free tissue is reached.

    Malignant melanoma is treated more aggressively than just surgical removal. To ensure the complete removal of this dangerous malignancy, 1-2 cm of normal-appearing skin surrounding the tumor is also removed. Depending on the thickness of the melanoma, neighboring lymph nodes may also be removed and tested for cancer. The sentinel lymph node biopsy method uses a mildly radioactive substance to identify which lymph nodes are most likely to be affected.

    Continued

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    How The Stage Is Determined

    Once you have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, your doctor will want to determine its stage. While the risk of this type of cancer spreading is low, determining the stage will help your doctor develop the best treatment plan.

    The TNM system is a uniform system for staging many types of cancer. TNM stands for:

    • T is for tumor: How far has the primary tumor grown through the layers of skin or to nearby tissues?
    • N is for nodes: Have cancer cells spread to the lymph nodes near the tumor?
    • M is for metastasis: Has the cancer metastasized to distant sites in the body such as the lungs or liver?

    Skin Cancer Doctor Discussion Guide

    What Is Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Of The Head And Neck

    HEALTH FROM TRUSTED SOURCES: Squamous Cell Carcinoma of ...

    Skin malignancies are the most common cancer in the United States, responsible for more than half of all new cancer cases. These can be broken down into melanoma and non-melanoma malignancies, which are squamous cell cancer and basal cell cancer. These skin malignancies are caused by ultraviolet radiation from exposure to the sun and tanning beds.

    Squamous cell cancer is the second most common form of skin cancer. It is more aggressive and may require extensive surgery depending on location and nerve involvement. Radiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy are used in advanced cases.

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