Friday, May 20, 2022
HomeNewsDoes Skin Cancer Have Symptoms

Does Skin Cancer Have Symptoms

The Abcdes Of Melanoma

What Does Skin Cancer Look Like?

To help people find a possible melanoma on their skin, dermatologists created the ABCDEs of melanoma:

A is for Asymmetry

If you find a spot on your skin that has any of the ABCDEs of melanoma, see a board-certified dermatologist for a skin exam.

The following pictures can help you see how the ABCDEs of melanoma can appear on the skin.

Symptoms On Black And Brown Skin

On dark skin, it may be easier to feel a lesion than see it. People with black skin may be more likely to find a lesion on a part of the body that has little exposure to the sun, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Skin cancer can affect people with any skin color, but those with brown or black skin are more likely to receive a diagnosis at a later stage. This may be due to a lack of awareness of how skin cancer appears on skin colors other than white.

Anyone who notices an unusual change in their skin should seek medical advice as soon as possible.

The medical community has developed two ways to spot the early symptoms of melanoma. This is the most dangerous type of skin cancer.

A person can use the ABCDE method or the ugly duckling method.

What Is The Outlook For People With Skin Cancer

Nearly all skin cancers can be cured if they are treated before they have a chance to spread. The earlier skin cancer is found and removed, the better your chance for a full recovery. Ninety percent of those with basal cell skin cancer are cured. It is important to continue following up with a dermatologist to make sure cancer does not return. If something seems wrong, call your doctor right away.

Most skin cancer deaths are from melanoma. If you are diagnosed with melanoma:

  • The five-year survival rate if its detected before it spreads to the lymph nodes is 99%.
  • The five-year survival rate if it has spread to nearby lymph nodes is 66%.
  • The five-year survival rate if it has spread to distant lymph nodes and other organs is 27%.

Also Check: Cancer Lesion Pictures

Causes And Risk Factors

Researchers do not know why certain cells become cancerous. However, they have identified some risk factors for skin cancer.

The most important risk factor for melanoma is exposure to UV rays. These damage the skin cellsâ DNA, which controls how the cells grow, divide, and stay alive.

Most UV rays come from sunlight, but they also come from tanning beds.

Some other risk factors for skin cancer include:

  • A lot of moles: A person with more than 100 moles is more likely to develop melanoma.
  • Fair skin, light hair, and freckles: The risk of developing melanoma is higher among people with fair skin. Those who burn easily have an increased risk.
  • Family history:

The best way to reduce the risk of skin cancer is to limit oneâs exposure to UV rays. A person can do this by using sunscreen, seeking shade, and covering up when outdoors.

People should also avoid tanning beds and sunlamps to reduce their risk of skin cancer.

It can be easy to mistake benign growths for skin cancer.

The following skin conditions have similar symptoms to skin cancer:

Who Is Most At Risk For Skin Cancer

Makeup To Cover Skin Cancer S

Although anyone can develop skin cancer, youre at increased risk if you:

  • Spend a considerable amount of time working or playing in the sun.
  • Get easily sunburned have a history of sunburns.
  • Live in a sunny or high-altitude climate.
  • Tan or use tanning beds.
  • Have light-colored eyes, blond or red hair and fair or freckled skin.
  • Have many moles or irregular-shaped moles.
  • Have actinic keratosis .
  • Have a family history of skin cancer.
  • Have had an organ transplant.
  • Take medications that suppress or weaken your immune system.
  • Have been exposed to ultraviolet light therapy for treating skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis.

Read Also: Stage 1 Cancer Symptoms

How Common Is Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in the U.S.

Other skin cancer facts:

  • Around 20% of Americans develop skin cancer sometime in their life.
  • Approximately 9,500 Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer every day.
  • Having five or more sunburns in your life doubles your chance of developing melanoma. The good news is that the five-year survival rate is 99% if caught and treated early.
  • Non-Hispanic white persons have almost a 30 times higher rate of skin cancer than non-Hispanic Black or Asian/Pacific Islander persons.
  • Skin cancer in people with skin of color is often diagnosed in later stages when its more difficult to treat. Some 25% of melanoma cases in African Americans are diagnosed when cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes.

Are All Moles Cancerous

Most moles are not cancerous. Some moles are present at birth, others develop up to about age 40. Most adults have between 10 and 40 moles.

In rare cases, a mole can turn into melanoma. If you have more than 50 moles, you have an increased chance of developing melanoma.

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Your skin is the largest organ in your body. It needs as much attention as any other health concern. What may seem like an innocent cosmetic imperfection, may not be. Performing regular skin self-checks is important for everyone and is especially important if you are a person at increased risk of skin cancer. Skin cancer is also color-blind. If you are a person of color, skin cancer can happen to you. Check your skin every month for any changes in skin spots or any new skin growths. Consider taking skin selfies so you can easily see if spots change over time. If youre a person of color, be sure to check areas more prone to cancer development, such as the palms of your hands, soles of your feet, between your toes, your genital area and under your nails. Takes steps to protect your skin. Always wear sunscreen with SPF of at least 30 every day of the year. Wear UV-A/UV-B protective sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats and long-sleeve shirts and pants. See your dermatologist at least once a year for a professional skin check.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 11/19/2021.

References

Recommended Reading: Can You Get Cancer In The Back Of Your Neck

What Are The Types Of Skin Cancer

There are 3 main types of skin cancer:

  • Basal cell carcinoma. The majority of skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma. Its a very treatable cancer. It starts in the basal cell layer of the skin and grows very slowly. The cancer usually appears as a small, shiny bump or nodule on the skin. It occurs mainly on areas exposed to the sun, such as the head, neck, arms, hands, and face. It more often occurs among people with light-colored eyes, hair, and skin.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma. This cancer is less common. It grows faster than basal cell carcinoma, but its also very treatable. Squamous cell carcinoma may appear as nodules or red, scaly patches of skin, and may be found on the face, ears, lips, and mouth. It can spread to other parts of the body, but this is rare. This type of skin cancer is most often found in people with light skin.

  • Melanoma. This type of skin cancer is a small portion of all skin cancers, but it causes the most deaths. It starts in the melanocyte cells that make pigment in the skin. It may begin as a mole that turns into cancer. This cancer may spread quickly. Melanoma most often appears on fair-skinned people, but is found in people of all skin types.

Symptoms If Cancer Has Spread To The Bone

Skin Cancer Screening | Symptoms, Types & Warning Signs

You might have any of the following symptoms if your cancer has spread to the bones:

  • pain from breakdown of the bone the pain is continuous and people often describe it as gnawing
  • backache, which gets worse despite resting
  • weaker bones they can break more easily
  • raised blood calcium , which can cause dehydration, confusion, sickness, tummy pain and constipation
  • low levels of blood cells blood cells are made in the bone marrow and can be crowded out by the cancer cells, causing anaemia, increased risk of infection, bruising and bleeding

Cancer in the spinal bones can cause pressure on the spinal cord. If it isn’t treated, it can lead to weakness in your legs, numbness, paralysis and loss of bladder and bowel control . This is called spinal cord compression. It is an emergency so if you have these symptoms, you need to contact your cancer specialist straight away or go to the accident and emergency department.

Recommended Reading: What Is The Prognosis For Basal Cell Carcinoma

Does Skin Cancer Affect People With Skin Of Color

People of all skin tones can develop skin cancer. If you are a person of color, you may be less likely to get skin cancer because you have more of the brown pigment, melanin, in your skin.

Although less prevalent than in nonwhite people, when skin cancer does develop in people of color, its often found late and has a worse prognosis. If youre Hispanic, the incidence of melanoma has risen by 20% in the past two decades. If youre Black and develop melanoma, your five-year survival rate is 25% lower than it is for white people . Part of the reason may be that it develops in less typical, less sun-exposed areas and its often in late-stage when diagnosed.

Tips For Screening Moles For Cancer

Examine your skin on a regular basis. A common location for melanoma in men is on the back, and in women, the lower leg. But check your entire body for moles or suspicious spots once a month. Start at your head and work your way down. Check the “hidden” areas: between fingers and toes, the groin, soles of the feet, the backs of the knees. Check your scalp and neck for moles. Use a handheld mirror or ask a family member to help you look at these areas. Be especially suspicious of a new mole. Take a photo of moles and date it to help you monitor them for change. Pay special attention to moles if you’re a teen, pregnant, or going through menopause, times when your hormones may be surging.

Also Check: Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Stage 2 Survival Rate

Who Gets Skin Cancer And Why

Sun exposure is the biggest cause of skin cancer. But it doesn’t explain skin cancers that develop on skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. Exposure to environmental hazards, radiation treatment, and even heredity may play a role. Although anyone can get skin cancer, the risk is greatest for people who have:

  • Fair skin or light-colored eyes
  • An abundance of large and irregularly-shaped moles
  • A family history of skin cancer
  • A history of excessive sun exposure or blistering sunburns
  • Lived at high altitudes or with year-round sunshine
  • Received radiation treatments

Identifying Basal Cell Carcinomas And Squamous Cell Carcinomas

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Non

There are two main categories of non-melanoma skin cancers: basal cell carcinomas, which are the most common, and squamous cell carcinomas, the second most common.

Before they become large, obvious cancers, “Basal cell carcinomas tend to be small, pink macules or papules small, flat areas or minimally bumpy areas on the skin that can at times look bright pink or occasionally are pearly white,” Dr. Paragh says.

One other sign of basal cell carcinomas is that they may frequently break open and can bleed or, at times, can be covered by a scab. Seemingly out of nowhere, a tiny open sore or wound may appear. The lesions may even look as if they healed at times, but the same spot will reopen and become a sore again.

“For basal cell carcinomas, people should look for small recurrent sores, areas that break open easily, areas that bleed easily, and pearly or pink bumps on the skin that continue to grow very slowly. Occasionally basal cell carcinomas may also show up as a small scar-like change on the skin in an area with no prior trauma, Dr. Paragh says. “As opposed to normal scars, these scar-like basal cell carcinomas will spontaneously grow, but very slowly.” Later “larger ulcerations with rolled borders, can also appear and show up as a more ominous sign of basal cell skin cancers.”

Don’t Miss: Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Survival Rate Stage 3

Treatment For Skin Cancer

If you are diagnosed with skin cancer, you may have multiple options for treatment. Based on the specifics of your case, your doctor will recommend your best course of action. The suggested methods for fighting the cancer may include:

  • Cryotherapy. In cryotherapy, a doctor freezes and kills precancerous or cancerous skin cells using liquid nitrogen. This technique is most often used to treat minor basal or squamous carcinomas or precancerous skin conditions.

  • Surgery. Different types of skin cancer may be removed by surgery. Surgery can be excisional – simply cutting out a cancerous area and the skin surrounding it – or may involve meticulous removal of layers of skin.

  • Radiation therapy. In radiation therapy, energy beams are used to kill cancerous cells. Radiation therapy may help finish off a cancer that was not fully removed by surgery, and can also be instrumental in cases that dont allow for surgery.

  • Chemotherapy. This type of therapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells. To treat some cases of skin cancer, chemotherapy may be applied locally through topical creams or lotions. It may also be administered by IV to target multiple body parts at once.

  • Immunotherapy. Immunotherapy, also called biological therapy, involves boosting the immune system to fight cancer cells. With the help of strengthening medicines, the immune system may be better prepared to kill cancerous cells.

What Skin Cancer Looks Like

Skin cancer appears on the body in many different ways. It can look like a:

  • Changing mole or mole that looks different from your others

  • Dome-shaped growth

  • Non-healing sore or sore that heals and returns

  • Brown or black streak under a nail

It can also show up in other ways.

To find skin cancer on your body, you dont have to remember a long list. Dermatologists sum it up this way. Its time to see a dermatologist if you notice a spot on your skin that:

  • Differs from the others

  • Itches

  • Bleeds

To make it easy for you to check your skin, the AAD created the Body Mole Map. Youll find everything you need to know on a single page. Illustrations show you how to examine your skin and what to look for. Theres even place to record what your spots look like. Youll find this page, which you can print, at Body Mole Map.

Read Also: Cancer Spread All Over Body

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Melanoma

Melanoma is a skin cancer that can show up on the skin in many ways. It can look like a:

  • Changing mole

  • Spot that looks like a new mole, freckle, or age spot, but it looks different from the others on your skin

  • Spot that has a jagged border, more than one color, and is growing

  • Dome-shaped growth that feels firm and may look like a sore, which may bleed

  • Dark-brown or black vertical line beneath a fingernail or toenail

  • Band of darker skin around a fingernail or toenail

  • Slowly growing patch of thick skin that looks like a scar

Early melanoma

This early melanoma could be mistaken for a mole, so its important to look carefully at the spots on your skin.

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Basal Cell Carcinoma

Signs and Symptoms of Skin Cancer

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that can show up on the skin in many ways. Also known as BCC, this skin cancer tends to grow slowly and can be mistaken for a harmless pimple, scar, or sore.

Common signs and symptoms of basal cell carcinoma

This skin cancer often develops on the head or neck and looks like a shiny, raised, and round growth.

To help you spot BCC before it grows deep into your skin, dermatologists share these 7 warning signs that could be easily missed.

If you find any of the following signs on your skin, see a board-certified dermatologist.

Don’t Miss: Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Grade 3 Life Expectancy

Warning Signs Of Basal Cell Carcinoma That You Could Mistake As Harmless

  • Warning sign: A pink or reddish growth that dips in the centerCan be mistaken for: A skin injury or acne scar

    A pink or reddish growth that dips in the center

    The BCC on this patients cheek could be mistaken for a minor skin injury.

  • Warning sign: A growth or scaly patch of skin on or near the earCan be mistaken for: Scaly, dry skin, minor injury, or scar

    A growth or scaly patch of skin on or near the ear

    BCC often develops on or near an ear, and this one could be mistaken for a minor skin injury.

  • Warning sign: A sore that doesn’t heal and may bleed, ooze, or crust overCan be mistaken for: Sore or pimple

    A sore that doesn’t heal, or heals and returns

    This patient mistook the BCC on his nose for a non-healing pimple.

  • Warning sign: A scaly, slightly raised patch of irritated skin, which could be red, pink, or another colorCan be mistaken for: Dry, irritated skin, especially if it’s red or pink

    A scaly, slightly raised patch of irritated skin

    This BCC could be mistaken for a patch of dry, irritated skin.

  • Warning sign: A round growth that may be pink, red, brown, black, tan, or the same color as your skinCan be mistaken for: A mole, wart, or other harmless growth.

    A round growth that may be same color as your skin

    Would you recognize this as a skin cancer, or would you dismiss it as a harmless growth on your face?

  • RELATED ARTICLES

    Popular Articles