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Can I Have Skin Cancer And Not Know It

Prognosis For Skin Cancer

What Does Skin Cancer Look Like?

It is not possible for a doctor to predict the exact course of a disease. However, your doctor may give you the likely outcome of the disease. If detected early, most skin cancers are successfully treated.

Most non-melanoma skin cancers do not pose a serious risk to your health but a cancer diagnosis can be a shock. If you want to talk to someone see your doctor. You can also call Cancer Council 13 11 20.

Tips For Screening Moles For Cancer

Examine your skin on a regular basis. A common location for melanoma in men is on the back, and in women, the lower leg. But check your entire body for moles or suspicious spots once a month. Start at your head and work your way down. Check the “hidden” areas: between fingers and toes, the groin, soles of the feet, the backs of the knees. Check your scalp and neck for moles. Use a handheld mirror or ask a family member to help you look at these areas. Be especially suspicious of a new mole. Take a photo of moles and date it to help you monitor them for change. Pay special attention to moles if you’re a teen, pregnant, or going through menopause, times when your hormones may be surging.

The Early Stages Of Skin Cancer

Some forms of cancer, especially melanoma, may appear suddenly and without warning. Most people become alarmed only when they develop a crust or sore that refuses to heal. Did you know that the early stages of cancer do not always look or feel so bad? Harmless-looking moles, skin lesions, or unusual skin growths may also be the signs of early stages.

Regular skin examination can help you spot these early clues. If you see anything suspicious or observe unusual appearances in your skin, we can help you get the right diagnosis and treatment immediately. Some forms of cancer in the skin can be life-threatening and spread without being given urgent attention.

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A Mole Is Itching Or Bleeding For No Reason

“Another sign is if a mole itches or bleeds for no reason,” Arthur said. “It’s one thing if you catch the mole on your backpack strap and then it bleeds. That is pretty clear-cut trauma and that’s not worrisome. But if a mole just bleeds and you don’t recall injuring the area, or if a mole is persistently itchy, that would always be something to have checked.”

Melanomas can happen on parts of your body that never see the light of day, Garner explained.

“That is not something I think the public has been made very aware of,” she said.

“Although sun exposure is definitely a risk factor for melanoma, there are also some genetic mutations that can lead to it,” Arthur added. “And so melanoma can occur in the retina, it can occur on the vulva of women, it can occur in the penis in men. You can see it in the peri-anal area. It can occur under a nail or on the bottom of your foot, even.”

The moral of the story: When you perform skin checks, don’t neglect the parts of you that aren’t sun-exposed. Arthur recommends checking your skin once monthly, using a full-length mirror and a hand mirror. Ask a loved one to help you check the parts you can’t see yourself.

When Should I See My Doctor

Would You Know Skin Cancer If You Saw It

Its important to check your own skin regularly to find any new or changing spots.

See your doctor or dermatologist straight away if you notice any changes to your skin, such as:

  • an ‘ugly duckling’ a spot that looks or feels different to any others
  • a spot that changes size, shape, colour or texture over time
  • a sore that doesnt go away after a few weeks
  • a sore that itches or bleeds

See the ‘ABCDE’ of skin cancer, above.

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Squamous Cell Skin Cancers

Squamous cell skin cancers can vary in how they look. They usually occur on areas of skin exposed to the sun like the scalp or ear.

Thanks to Dr Charlotte Proby for her permission and the photography.

You should see your doctor if you have:

  • a spot or sore that doesn’t heal within 4 weeks
  • a spot or sore that hurts, is itchy, crusty, scabs over, or bleeds for more than 4 weeks
  • areas where the skin has broken down and doesn’t heal within 4 weeks, and you can’t think of a reason for this change

Your doctor can decide whether you need any tests.

  • Cancer and its management J Tobias and D HochhauserBlackwell, 2015

  • Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology VT De Vita, TS Lawrence and SA RosenbergWolters Kluwer, 2018

Warning: Graphic Image Below

If not treated it may eventually cause dramatic disfigurement yet will very rarely metastasize in even the most neglected cases.

Many years of basal cell carcinoma neglect. Apparently this patient didnt know that cancer was eating away at his face.

Squamous cell carcinoma which will likely metastasize if left untreated begins insidiously, appearing first as a faded pink and very flat patchy area on the skin.

A person can go for years without knowing that this usually slow growing skin cancer is progressing.

Many people even in industrialized nations do not check their skin monthly and never get clinical exams and may even be fully aware of a new lesion yet get so used to it that it never dawns on them that its malignant.

There may be the It cant happen to me mindset, along with those who are afraid of what the doctor might find, and those who avoid doctors because they dont have health insurance or because they are cognitively impaired.

Often, people will notice something growing on their face or scalp but chalk it up to older age or benign damage from the sun.

Its possible to have melanoma for several years without knowing it, because some kinds of melanomas grow rather slowly and spread out laterally before they begin burrowing vertically into deeper layers of skin tissue.

Melanoma on the bottom of a foot.

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How To Do A Skin Self

Your doctor or nurse may suggest that you do a regular self-exam to check for skin cancer, including melanoma.

The best time to do this exam is after a shower or bath. You should check your skin in a room with plenty of light. You should use a full-length mirror and a handheld mirror. Its best to begin by learning where your birthmarks, moles, and other marks are and their usual look and feel.Check for anything new:

  • Change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole
  • Sore that does not heal

Check yourself from head to toe. Dont forget to check your back, scalp, genital area, and between your buttocks.

  • Look at your face, neck, ears, and scalp. You may want to use a comb or a blow dryer to move your hair so that you can see better. You also may want to have a relative or friend check through your hair. It may be hard to check your scalp by yourself.
  • Look at the front and the back of your body in the mirror, then raise your arms and look at your left and right sides.
  • Bend your elbows. Look carefully at your fingernails, palms, forearms , and upper arms.
  • Examine the back, front, and sides of your legs. Also look around your genital area and between your buttocks.
  • Sit and closely examine your feet, including your toenails, your soles, and between your toes.

Determining If The Cancer Has Spread

How to Recognize Skin Cancer | Skin Cancer

As part of your diagnosis, your doctor will also determine what stage the cancer is in. The different stages refer to whether and how far the cancer has spread in your body, on a Roman numeral scale of I to IV. A stage I cancer is small and contained to the body part where it originated, whereas a stage IV cancer has spread aggressively to other parts of the body.

Depending on the type of skin cancer that a person has, it may be more or less likely that it has spread through the body. For instance, basal cell skin cancer rarely spreads beyond the skin where it starts. However, melanomas and large squamous cell carcinomas are more likely to spread into other regions of the body. Cases of melanoma, in particular, may call for further tests to determine the specific stage theyre in.

Your doctor may evaluate multiple factors in order to stage the cancer. Using biopsies and imaging tests, your doctor may take a look at:

  • The size and thickness of the tumor, and whether it has grown into surrounding tissues

  • Nearby lymph nodes, to check for signs of cancer spread

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What Is Skin Cancer

Skin cancer happens when skin cells grow and multiply in an uncontrolled, unorderly way.

Normally, new skin cells form when cells grow old and die or when they become damaged. When this process doesnt work as it should, a rapid growth of cells results. This collection of cells may be noncancerous , which dont spread or cause harm, or cancerous, which may spread to nearby tissue or other areas in your body if not caught early and treated.

Skin cancer is often caused by ultraviolet light exposure from the sun.

There are three main types of skin cancer:

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common types of skin cancer and are sometimes called non-melanoma skin cancer.

Melanoma is not as common as basal cell or squamous cell carcinomas but is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. If left untreated or caught in a late-stage, melanomas are more likely to spread to organs beyond the skin, making them difficult to treat and potentially life-limiting.

Fortunately, if skin cancer is identified and treated early, most are cured. This is why it is important to take a few safeguards and to talk with your healthcare provider if you think you have any signs of skin cancer.

Where Does Skin Cancer Develop

Skin cancer is most commonly seen in sun-exposed areas of your skin your face , ears, neck, arms, chest, upper back, hands and legs. However, it can also develop in less sun-exposed and more hidden areas of skin, including between your toes, under your fingernails, on the palms of your hands, soles of your feet and in your genital area.

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Risk Of Further Melanomas

Most people treated for early melanoma do not have further trouble with the disease. However, when there is a chance that the melanoma may have spread to other parts of your body, you will need regular check-ups.

Your doctor will decide how often you will need check-ups everyone is different. They will become less frequent if you have no further problems.

After treatment for melanoma it is important to limit exposure to the sun’s UV radiation. A combination of sun protection measures should be used during sun protection times .

As biological family members usually share similar traits, your family members may also have an increased risk of developing melanoma and other skin cancers. They can reduce their risk by spending less time in the sun and using a combination of sun protection measures during sun protection times.

It is important to monitor your skin regularly and if you notice any changes in your skin, or enlarged lymph glands near to where you had the cancer, see your specialist as soon as possible.

One Of Your Moles Has Changed

The 25+ best Cancerous moles ideas on Pinterest

Melanoma is less common, but it’s the deadliest form of skin cancer, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

“Melanoma can either show up as a new spot or it can arise within an existing mole,” Arthur said. ” a mole that has changed in size, shape, or color. It may be suspicious if a mole has multiple colors or unusual colors like red, white, blue, or black.”

The National Cancer Institute uses a handy acronym to remember all the potentially concerning mole changes: ABCDE.

  • A stands for asymmetry. In melanoma, two sides of a mole often don’t match.
  • B stands for borders. A melanoma usually has irregular borders, rather than clearly defined ones.
  • C stands for color, since melanomas are usually uneven in color.
  • D stands for diameter. An increase in a mole’s size, or diameter, could indicate melanoma.
  • E stands for evolving. Watch out for moles that change over time.

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How Is Skin Cancer Of The Head And Neck Diagnosed

Diagnosis is made by clinical exam and a biopsy. Basal cell and squamous cell cancers are staged by size and extent of growth. Basal cell cancers rarely metastasize to lymph nodes, but they can grow quite large and invade local structures. Squamous cell cancers have a much higher incidence of lymph node involvement in the neck and parotid gland and can spread along nerves.

Melanoma is staged, based not on size but on how deeply it invades the skin layers. Therefore, a superficial or shave biopsy will not provide accurate staging information used to guide treatment. Melanomas can have a very unpredictable course and may spread to distant organs. Melanomas with intermediate thickness often require sentinel node biopsy, a surgical procedure performed by a head and neck surgeon, to determine if microscopic spreading to lymph nodes has occurred.

What Do The Early Stages Of Skin Cancer Look Like

People can have stages of skin cancer and yet not feel ill, which makes early treatment and diagnosis a little challenging. But by being aware of the early stages of this disease, you can protect yourself and seek effective treatment right away. Do you have scaly patches, raised growths, or sores that do not heal? Dr. Jurzyk from Advanced Dermatology Center in Wolcott, CT can help you identify and treat all types of cancer of the skin, keeping you from fatal complications.

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Look Out For An Ugly Duckling

The Ugly Duckling is another warning sign of melanoma. This recognition strategy is based on the concept that most normal moles on your body resemble one another, while melanomas stand out like ugly ducklings in comparison. This highlights the importance of not just checking for irregularities, but also comparing any suspicious spot to surrounding moles to determine whether it looks different from its neighbors. These ugly duckling lesions or outlier lesions can be larger, smaller, lighter or darker, compared to surrounding moles. Also, isolated lesions without any surrounding moles for comparison are considered ugly ducklings.

How Is Skin Cancer Treated

BASAL CELL SKIN CANCER: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW| DR DRAY

Treatment depends upon the stage of cancer. Stages of skin cancer range from stage 0 to stage IV. The higher the number, the more cancer has spread.

Sometimes a biopsy alone can remove all the cancer tissue if the cancer is small and limited to your skins surface only. Other common skin cancer treatments, used alone or in combination, include:

Cryotherapy uses liquid nitrogen to freeze skin cancer. The dead cells slough off after treatment. Precancerous skin lesions, called actinic keratosis, and other small, early cancers limited to the skins top layer can be treated with this method.

Excisional surgery

This surgery involves removing the tumor and some surrounding healthy skin to be sure all cancer has been removed.

Mohs surgery

With this procedure, the visible, raised area of the tumor is removed first. Then your surgeon uses a scalpel to remove a thin layer of skin cancer cells. The layer is examined under a microscope immediately after removal. Additional layers of tissue continue to be removed, one layer at a time, until no more cancer cells are seen under the microscope.

Mohs surgery removes only diseased tissue, saving as much surrounding normal tissue as possible. Its most often used to treat basal cell and squamous cell cancers and near sensitive or cosmetically important areas, such as eyelids, ears, lips, forehead, scalp, fingers or genital area.

Curettage and electrodesiccation

Chemotherapy and immunotherapy

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

This photo contains content that some people may find graphic or disturbing.

DermNet NZ

Squamous cell carcinoma in situ, also known as Bowens disease, is a precancerous condition that appears as a red or brownish patch or plaque on the skin that grows slowly over time. The patches are often found on the legs and lower parts of the body, as well as the head and neck. In rare cases, it has been found on the hands and feet, in the genital area, and in the area around the anus.

Bowens disease is uncommon: only 15 out of every 100,000 people will develop this condition every year. The condition typically affects the Caucasian population, but women are more likely to develop Bowens disease than men. The majority of cases are in adults over 60. As with other skin cancers, Bowens disease can develop after long-term exposure to the sun. It can also develop following radiotherapy treatment. Other causes include immune suppression, skin injury, inflammatory skin conditions, and a human papillomavirus infection.

Bowens disease is generally treatable and doesnt develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Up to 16% of cases develop into cancer.

Symptoms On Black And Brown Skin

On dark skin, it may be easier to feel a lesion than see it. People with black skin may be more likely to find a lesion on a part of the body that has little exposure to the sun, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Skin cancer can affect people with any skin color, but those with brown or black skin are more likely to receive a diagnosis at a later stage. This may be due to a lack of awareness of how skin cancer appears on skin colors other than white.

Anyone who notices an unusual change in their skin should seek medical advice as soon as possible.

The medical community has developed two ways to spot the early symptoms of melanoma. This is the most dangerous type of skin cancer.

A person can use the ABCDE method or the ugly duckling method.

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